1分快三玩法

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Say Cheese, Mona Lisa


Visit Olympian City’s interactive ‘Think Like Leonardo da Vinci 500th
1分快三玩法Anniversary Exhibition’, a progressive playground of learning and fun

Say Cheese, Mona Lisa


Visit Olympian City’s interactive ‘Think Like Leonardo da Vinci 500th
Anniversary Exhibition’, a progressive playground of learning and fun

Culture > Talk of the Town


 

Say Cheese, Mona Lisa

December 23, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

The just-opened ‘Think Like Leonardo da Vinci 500th Anniversary Exhibition,” at Olympian City mall, a collaboration between The Hong Kong Innovation Foundation and Sino Group with Italy’s Leonardo3 (L3) Museum, celebrates not only the world’s most progressive artist, but feels like the most educational, insightful and interactive universe a child, or adult, could step into with its multi-sensory experiences. 

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Da Vinci was not only a scientist and painter but an architect, engineer, mathematician and musician. “Leonardo da Vinci is a pioneer of STEM and STEAM, he has left a far-reaching impact on the world with his forward thinking,” says Nikki Ng, deputy chairwoman of the Hong Kong Innovation Foundation. “By showcasing machines built from da Vinci’s concepts and providing interactive experiences, the exhibition is expected to not only inspire Hong Kong people but also help encourage I&T development.”

On display is a series of mechanical models of da Vinci’s flying machines, musical instruments, ships, transport, architectural structures and conceptual designs which have inspired the inventing generations that followed him and a series of interactive experiences which allow visitors to step into Renaissance life.

There’s no better place to start than The Mona Lisa1分快三玩法, the world’s most famous painting. The mysterious smile has captivated historians and artists alike. An interactive installation unveils the secrets behind the masterpiece, and visitors can become the icon by snapping “My Mona Lisa Smile’ photos to be displayed on the mall’s mega screen Mona Lisa mosaic. Sino Group will donate HK$5 for each photo taken and displayed to local charity ‘Smile with Us HK’. 

Perhaps you’re Leonardo’s ideal man, or woman? One of Da Vinci’s most famous works, Vitruvian Man, is based on the theories of Roman architect Vitruvius, who proposed a so- called “golden ratio”, in which every part of the human body corresponds to architectural proportions. Da Vinci illustrated the idea with an adult male outstretched in two overlapping poses – his limbs touching a circle in one, then within a square consisting of 64 smaller squares in the other. Visitors can compare their build with a body scanner; participants with the closest fit each week will receive an HK$200 voucher from an Olympian City merchant. 

Or take to the skies. Leonard’s Codex on Flight contains his drawings and inventions related to getting man aloft, and contributed to the invention of early 20th century human flight. Participants wear a sensor to control a flying device with their body in a flying contest, and receive a gift for completing the game. Participants with the highest score each week receives a HK$200 voucher from an Olympian City merchant. 

“We hope the public space in Olympian City will come into play in introducing da Vinci’s legacy and STEAM and inspire the general public,” says David Ng, group associate director of Sino Group of the project. Say cheese, Mona Lisa.


(Until February 16, 2020)
Opening hours: noon - 9pm
Venue: 18 Hoi Ting Rd, Central Atrium, Ground Floor, Olympian City

Images: provided to China Daily

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Ride of a Lifetime


Chinese artist Yang Yongliang’s virtual-reality film Nine Dragons is a visual spectacle like none other

Ride of a Lifetime


Chinese artist Yang Yongliang’s virtual-reality film Nine Dragons is a visual spectacle like none other

Culture > Talk of the Town


 

Ride of a Lifetime

January 8, 2020 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

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Miss it and you’ll be kicking yourself – you’ve got until Saturday evening to see Views of Water, showcasing the remarkable, otherworldly new body of work by the innovative Chinese artist Yang Yongliang. For Yang’s second solo exhibition at Whitestone Gallery in H Queen’s, he has again delivered what he does best, using the newest techniques to reinvigorate the oldest art forms. 

The exhibition is separated into three sections. First is a six-part series of eight-minute videos in which Yang has reconceptualised masterpieces by the Song Dynasty painter Ma Yuan (1160–1225) by infusing them with an undercurrent of environmental concern, given globally rising sea levels and temperatures. There’s also a series of lightboxes that form a second work, in which Yang has transformed digital images and developed them onto negative film. 

Finally comes the real showstopper: Nine Dragons, Yang’s latest virtual-reality work, which debuted at the Cannes Film Festival in 2019 and is being shown in a gallery space for the first time. Again, Yang invokes a Southern Song Dynasty artist, this time Chen Rong and his Nine Dragons1分快三玩法 (1244), a handscroll painting in which the nine dragons soar among clouds, mists, seas, fire and mountains. 

This artwork really stands out, as there’s a special raised seat in the gallery equipped with goggles, allowing viewers to fully immerse themselves with the ten-minute work while virtually sitting on the back of a dragon, travelling over rocky mountains and underneath the ocean, simulating the sensations of riding such a beast. The goggles allow you to gaze in any and all directions, affording a 360-degree sweep of narrative and adventure. 

When was the last time your art or cinema experience consisted of a journey “felt” through a dragon’s point of view? It might be Song Dynasty-influenced, but it’s rendered in today’s pitch-perfect tune of art’s digital dynasty.


Whitestone Gallery, 7/F–8/F, H Queen’s, 80 Queen’s Road Central, Central
Tel: +852 2523 8001
Hours: 11am–7pm (closed Sun/Mon/PH)
(whitestone-gallery.com)

Images: provided to China Daily

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What’s On


Whether it’s music, art, stage, screen, exhibitions, restaurant and cocktail deals, or the great outdoors – there are always some entertaining happenings around Hong Kong

What’s On


1分快三玩法Whether it’s music, art, stage, screen, exhibitions, restaurant and cocktail deals, or the great outdoors – there are always some entertaining happenings around Hong Kong

Culture > Talk of the Town


 

What’s On

November 27, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

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Unlocking the Secrets: The Science of Conservation at the Palace Museum

What The year 2020 is an important milestone in the 600-year history of Beijing’s Forbidden City. To mark the occasion, the Hong Kong Jockey Club Series presents Unlocking the Secrets: The Science of Conservation at the Palace Museum1分快三玩法, which tells the untold stories behind the conservation work of the cultural relics within. Around 140 priceless artefacts will be displayed, ranging from bronzes, clocks, textiles, thangkas, wood furniture and lacquerware to inlaid objects, ceramics and hand-painted replicas of ancient paintings. Some of the exhibits have recently been conserved and have never been shown before.

Where Hong Kong Science Museum, 2 Science Museum Road, Tsim Sha Tsui East

When December 14, 2019–March 18, 2020

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From Bronze to Gold


It’s your rare chance to own a ritual vessel from ancient China, courtesy of famed art dealer and Asian art expert Christian Deydier at his new gallery in Hong Kong

From Bronze to Gold


It’s your rare chance to own a ritual vessel from ancient China, courtesy of famed art dealer and Asian art expert Christian Deydier at his new gallery in Hong Kong

Culture > Talk of the Town


 

From Bronze to Gold 

November 13, 2019

People in ancient China believed strongly in spirits and the afterlife – and that the deceased required material comfort. The worship and appeasement of the spirits, coupled with the proper care (or lack of it) of ancestors in the afterlife, was thought to exert a direct influence on the lives and fortunes of the living. 

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Though it’s impossible to pinpoint a date, such beliefs probably started as early as the Erlitou culture (circa the 19th–17th/16th centuries BC) during the Xia dynasty (21st–17th/16th centuries BC). They gave rise to an active cult of spirit and ancestral worship, which dominated the society of the subsequent Shang dynasty (17th/16th–12th/11th centuries BC) and has survived among the Chinese people up to the present day.

Bronze vessels were especially made for elaborate rituals and worship ceremonies. According to their form and size, they were used to cook or reheat fish or various meats, or to heat fermented beverages made from grains such as rice, sorghum and barley.

Today, these priceless pieces of history can be yours. From Bronze to Gold: Ritual Vessels from Ancient China, a rare selling exhibition held from November 23 to December 14 at Deydier Hong Kong, features numerous exceptional pieces from the Shang and early Zhou dynasties that are available for purchase. 

Among them, two are particularly intriguing. First, there’s a rare fangding bronze cooking vessel from the Western Zhou dynasty, circa 10th century BC. It’s decorated on each side with two large birds, facing each other and shown in profile, on a leiwen1分快三玩法 background. This rectangular type of vessel, with two vertical handles fixed on the rim and supported by four cylindrical legs, appears, in bronze, at the beginning of the Shang dynasty during the Erligang period (circa 17th/16th–14th centuries BC). 

Next, there’s an exceptional jiao (“wine/alcohol”) vessel from the Yinxu period in the Shang dynasty. Established in pottery during the Neolithic period, jiao vessels appeared in bronze for the first time at the end of the Erlitou cultural period (18th/17th centuries BC) and became very popular in the transitional period between the late Shang dynasty and the early Western Zhou dynasty around the 11th century BC.

When cast, bronze vessels had a yellow colour resembling gold – and this is why the people of those early periods used the term 金 (jin, which in modern Chinese means “gold”) to refer to these bronze vessels. Since gold was extremely rare during those early periods, very few pieces were produced during the Shang and Zhou dynasties. However, during the Han dynasty (206 BC–220 AD), more gold objects were produced as a result of the contact with nomadic tribes from the north of China, as those tribes were fond of gold items.

1分快三玩法During the 7th century and the first half of the 8th century, significant quantities of gold were sent from Tibet to China as a tribute, making gold very popular with the Tang aristocracy. It was at that time that gold and silver vessels began to be produced on a large scale by the imperial gold and silver workshops.

Ritual Buddhist object vajra, wood and gold, northern China, nomadic Qidan tribe, 9th–10th centuries AD , long: 23cm

1分快三玩法In the 10th century, nomadic tribes known as Qidan (or Khitan) invaded part of northern China and founded the Liao dynasty, during which they ruled this large territory from 907 to 1125. The Liao people were extremely fond of gold and used it to produce belts, jewellery, horse harnesses, saddle ornaments, funerary objects (such as boxes, bowls, dishes, mortuary masks and caps) and items used for religious rituals. All those objects were either cast in pure gold, or made in wood or ceramics and covered with gold.

1分快三玩法Among them, the rarest Liao creations are white-glazed ceramics covered with gold. Those ceramics were made by Chinese craftsmen from the Ding and Cizhou workshops who, after the conquest of the Hebei province, worked in the Liao kilns in Gangwa (about 70km southwest of Chifeng) and Longquanwu (west of Beijing).

The technique of covering part of the ceramics with a decorated gold sheet was quite rare during the Liao dynasty. One white porcelain glazed dish – dated 959, near the beginning of the period, and excavated in 1954 at Tomb #1 in Dayingzi Village near Chifeng, and now displayed in the Inner Mongolia Museum at Hohhot – has a gold rim on its lips and foot ring. In the centre of the foot ring is the Chinese character guan1分快三玩法 (“official”), indicating that the piece was made in kilns for special use by the Qidan imperial family and officials.

According to this insignia, it can be said that the present group of white glazed ceramics, decorated with gold sheet in openwork, were made for the use of the Qidan imperial family and officials for daily life and during religious rituals. As the two vajra (a five-pronged spherical club) are typically Buddhist objects, we may consider that some cups, bowls and ewers (jugs) were used to drink tea during some ritual ceremonies, as tea is linked to Buddhism – and more precisely to the Chan禪 (Zen) School of Buddhism. With its emphasis on meditation, the school recommended that its followers drink tea in order to remain alert and awake during their long hours, or even days, of meditation.

Deydier Hong Kong is also honoured to showcase a group of wood and white-glazed ceramics that are entirely decorated with gold sheet. Among these treasures, two particularly exceptional objects are of note. First is a white-glazed ceramic chadou, entirely covered with gold sheet and decorated in openwork, which was likely made for the Qidan imperial family or some high-ranking officials. Then there’s a rare ritual Buddhist object in wood and gold, in the shape of a vajra with finials taking the form of lotus bulbs.

Deydier Hong Kong opened in October and is located at Tower B, Shop 1, 123 Hollywood Road in Sheung Wan. From November 23 to December 14, discover these timeless treasures within – and consider adding a valuable piece of history to your collection.

 

Ritual bronze food vessel fangding, 1分快三玩法Western Zhou dynasty, 10th century BC, height: 19cm

White-glazed stoneware chadou1分快三玩法 decorated with gold, northern China, nomadic Qidan tribe, 10th century AD, diameter: 18.2cm, height: 15.4cm

Ritual bronze wine vessel jiao, 1分快三玩法Shang dynasty, Yinxu period, circa 13th century BC, height: 23.5cm

White-glazed stoneware dish decorated with gold, northern China, nomadic Qidan tribe, 10th century AD, diameter: 14cm

Ritual bronze food vessel ding1分快三玩法, late Shang dynasty, 12th–11th centuries BC, height: 23.9cm

 
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Hong Kong Jewish Film Festival 2019


Hong Kong Jewish Film Festival 2019


Culture > Talk of the Town


 

Hong Kong Jewish Film Festival 2019 

October 28, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Celebrating 20 years, this year’s Hong Kong Jewish Film Festival (HKJFF) at the Asia Society Hong Kong Center features a dynamic and diverse programme. The HKJFF opener is feel-good factor Tel Aviv on Fire, director Sameh Zoabi’s award-winning comedy on the subject of troubled Israel–Palestinian relations told through the perils of young Palestinian scriptwriter Salam, working on the sitcom of the same name as the film. The show is a big hit on both sides of the wall, and the film poignantly depicts Salam’s professional and personal challenges, from his allegiance with an Israeli checkpoint officer to his creative differences with the show’s producers as to how the series will end, and to his attempts to reconcile with his ex-girlfriend.  

Check out our top-five selection of the best of the rest:

Esau

Adapted from the novel of the same name by Israeli author Meir Shalev, Esau1分快三玩法 follows a 40-year-old writer who returns to his family home after half a lifetime to face the brother who stole both his love and his livelihood. The story is a modern twist on the biblical story of Jacob and Esau in the book of Genesis. Russian director Pavel Lungin’s film features a stirring performance by acclaimed actor Harvey Keitel. 

In Between

Three independent Palestinian women choose a life of freedom in the Yemenite section of Tel Aviv (along with those in Gaza and the West Bank, Palestinians compose 20% of the Israeli citizenry) – a far cry from their traditional upbringing. When the religiously conservative Nor joins as their new roommate, their drug-fuelled bohemian lifestyle comes under sharp scrutiny. In Between1分快三玩法 is Palestinian female filmmaker Maysaloun Hamoud’s directorial feature debut. 

Fig Tree

Sixteen-year-old Jewish girl Mina is trying to navigate between a surreal routine dictated by the civil war in Ethiopia and her last days of youth with her Christian boyfriend, Eli. When she discovers that her family is planning to immigrate to Israel and escape the war, she weaves an alternate plan in order to save Eli. But in times of war, plans tend to go awry. Fig Tree marks director Aäläm-Wärqe Davidian’s debut film, based on her childhood memories.

King Bibi 

Dan Shadur’s documentary explores Benjamin Netanyahu’s rise to power using archival footage of his media performances, from being a popular guest expert on American television to his public confession of adultery, and to his mastery of the art of social media. “Bibi” is perceived as both saviour and sinner, a cynical politician who will justify any means to retain his power. Wherever you stand on Netanyahu, King Bibi makes for compelling viewing. 

Golda’s Balcony

Actress Tovah Feldshuh recreates her Tony Award-nominated performance as Golda Meir in William Gibson’s stage masterpiece; it has won the Audience Award prize in all ten of the competitive film festivals in which it has screened. The rise of Golda Meir, from Russian schoolgirl to Israeli prime minister, is one of the most thrilling and remarkable narratives of the 20th century.  

Images: provided to China Daily

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Cultural Capital


Art-minded Chinese millennials and Gen Z-ers may just be the future of Hong Kong’s tourism industry – and K11 Musea wants early ownership

Cultural Capital


Art-minded Chinese millennials and Gen Z-ers may just be the future of Hong Kong’s tourism industry – and K11 Musea wants early ownership

Culture > Talk of the Town


 

Cultural Capital

September 18, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

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If Chinese millennials and their Gen Z counterparts (those born after 1995) represent the future of Hong Kong’s tourism industry, then the city and its luxury brands may need to rethink their staid approaches. Up to three-quarters of Gen Z-ers polled in studies admit to spending five hours per day online and, unlike their millennial forebears, who have grown to become digitally savvy, Gen Z are the first digital natives – meaning they have no knowledge or experience of a non-digital world. As a result, they value digital influencers as being more relatable than conventional celebrities, and look to them as role models and even educators. In an Ernst & Young report from last year, 85% of Gen Z-ers named YouTube as their favourite site. They’re uber-connected – multi-screening and cross-platforming on all manner of devices and social media sites simultaneously. 

Into this dizzying new world comes K11 Musea, opening this month on the Tsim Sha Tsui promenade. It represents a new retail concept for millennials and Gen Z-ers who gravitate towards the immersive consumption of art, culture and commerce. After ten years of full-on luxury and fashion marketing by Western brands in China, art has become the most useful and topical muse for luxury marketing on the mainland – witness Chanel’s recent Mademoiselle Privé exhibition in Shanghai, through which Chinese artists were asked to reinterpret Coco Chanel’s inspirations. 

1分快三玩法French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu said art and brands were interlinked when the middle class becomes the dominant one in a society and starts searching for cultural capital – hence, China. And when this is combined with a prominent institution, so much the better. K11 has partnered with the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Armory Show in New York and the Royal Academy of Arts in London. 

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1分快三玩法K11 Musea is part of the K11 Group, which was founded in 2008 by New World Development heir and entrepreneur Adrian Cheng. It will anchor the new three-million-square-foot, US$2.6 billion Victoria Dockside art and design district, developed by parent company New World Group with the goal of revitalising the Kowloon harbourfront. 

Through K11, Cheng’s stated aim is to “connect China’s cultural ecosystem and its emerging millennials and Generation Z with the world”. By 2023, K11 is set to have a footprint in nine cities across the Greater China region. Cheng has said he actively wants to “democratise art by creating a habit for millennials to appreciate and understand all forms of beauty”.

As such, he’s going after big prizes to win the hearts, minds and wallets of the next generation in the hope of offering up new cultural capital for consumers. From November 12 to 17, K11 Musea will host the Festival de Cannes Film Week, which will include six films from the 2019 festival, along with guest appearances from industry professionals, directors and actors via a series of Q&As and masterclasses. “This is an important milestone for K11 Musea as we look to develop an ongoing programme of innovative cultural events for our international audience,” says Cheng of the French Riviera film centre’s Asian debut in Hong Kong. 

1分快三玩法The cross-cultural exercise has long been an ambition of the Festival de Cannes organisers. “There is no better place to extend this experience than Hong Kong, which has seen the origins of so many great filmmakers who have come to show their films in Cannes,” say Pierre Lescure and Thierry Frémaux, the president and the general delegate of the Festival de Cannes, respectively. 

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Cheng has also put in a cinema to accommodate those French Riviera ambitions. The new UA flagship cinema K11 Art House is a multifunctional space for interactive performances of all sorts. With 12 theatres and a total of 1,708 seats, K11 Art House has advanced projection and sound systems, an IMAX laser projection system, stage facilities, intelligent self-service and a disabilities-inclusive environment, as well as a “six-star” VIP theatre that offers personalised customer experiences via a team of professionals. K11 Art House will be one of the city’s largest cinemas, both in size and ambition. 

K11 Musea will also house British retail and hospitality brand Fortnum & Mason, the upmarket London department store that counts the British royal family among its clients. It has signed an eight-year lease to open a two-storey space, one of which will comprise a 100-seat restaurant that serves the company’s world-famous high tea. 

This project represents a milestone for Fortnum & Mason as its first standalone store and restaurant concept outside of the UK. The brand is capitalising on its existing retail partnerships across Asia, which include Lane Crawford in Hong Kong, Isetan Mitsukoshi in Japan and Shinsegae in South Korea. 

“We have seen significant appetite for our brand and products in the region, with impressive year-on-year sales growth,” says Kate Hobhouse, the chairman of Fortnum & Mason. “We are therefore incredibly proud to continue our record of investment and growth by expanding our business into new markets, and reinforcing our support for amazing producers and suppliers and creating new opportunities.” 

Fortnum & Mason CEO Ewan Venters reinforces the appeal of the move. “We are excited to establish in such a pioneering development,” he says. “K11 Musea is a unique retail destination in Hong Kong that speaks to the growing consumer demand for immersive experiences of art, culture and commerce. As a business with creativity and innovation at its core, we believe the partnership is a natural fit.”

In addition to its flagship art malls, the K11 Group also operates K11 Atelier, a network of office buildings for the next-generation workforce; K11 Artus, which comprises luxury residences for worldly travellers; open education platform K11 Kulture Academy; the terrarium-inspired transformative retail concept K11 Natural; consulting and market research institution K11 Future Taskforce; and K11 Art Foundation, China’s first not-for-profit incubator for Chinese artists and curators. Hong Kong’s new cultural capital is here – at K11 Musea. 

Images provided to China Daily

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Hong Kong’s Fashion Farm Foundation leads local labels to Paris Fashion Week


Hong Kong’s Fashion Farm Foundation leads local labels to Paris Fashion Week


Culture > Talk of the Town


 

Hong Kong’s Fashion Farm Foundation leads local labels to Paris Fashion Week 

September 11, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

1分快三玩法It’s one thing making a name for oneself as a fashion designer in Hong Kong, but quite another leveraging that step to gain greater international acclaim. Cue a host of local labels who will present their SS20 collections at Paris Fashion Week (PFW) later this month, as part of the Fashion Farm Foundation’s (FFF) reception on September 25 to introduce their work to international insiders, media and celebrities as part of PFW SS20. 

Committed to providing opportunities for young fashion professionals in Hong Kong, FFF will take eight brands - Anaïs Jourden, Christian Stone, Cynthia & Xiao, FromClothingOf, Green by Room 220, Ka Wa Key, Redemptive and YLYstudio, each of which will espouse their local lifestyle, culture, traditional craftsmanship and tech-based design skills, while illustrating their brand and design concepts, as a way of promoting the Hong Kong fashion industry. The initiative is supported and fully sponsored by CreateHK and HKFG (formerly known as Fashion Guerrilla) which has been promoting local fashion talents to step onto the world stage since 2013. 

Images: provided to China Daily

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Next Stop: History


Get closer to the city’s roots and take a relaxing ride on the Hong Kong TramOramic Tour

Next Stop: History


Get closer to the city’s roots and take a relaxing ride on the Hong Kong TramOramic Tour

Culture > Talk of the Town


Next Stop: History

June 26, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Transportation is one of the keys to Hong Kong – and there’s no shortage of modes, including the Star Ferry, the MTR, double-decker buses and mini-buses. But topping the list should be the “Ding Ding” – or the tram, one of the city’s most important icons, which has now been in operation for 115 years.

1分快三玩法The TramOramic Tour, operated by Hong Kong Tramways and departing three times daily, is the city’s first-ever sightseeing tour aboard a 1920s-style heritage tram with an open-top upper deck. As the one-hour journey passes through the city, stories and sites of interest are broadcast (in a choice of eight languages via headphones) to passengers. The tour also features an on-board video that compares past and present Hong Kong, as well as a heritage corner with vintage pictures and tram souvenirs. To continue your exploration of the city, the tour also includes a two-day pass that grants riders unlimited free access on the regular trams.

The Hong Kong tram is the only double-level tram still in existence in the world today. It’s a remarkable bridge between the city’s past and present. Things all began with a fleet of 26 single-level tramcars that were manufactured in the UK, then shipped to Hung Hom and assembled locally in 1904. Due to increasing demand for the cheap and convenient transportation, the first double-level tramcar was introduced in 1912; it was an open-top design with garden-style seats. 

Today, the fleet numbers 164, covering several routes along Hong Kong Island. Though the tram runs at a leisurely pace compared to other options, many residents take it as their preferred mode of transportation. In a busy, thriving metropolis like Hong Kong, if you want to take a real, in-depth look at the city, what better way could there be than on the Ding Ding? ()

Images: Hong Kong Tramways

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Capital Gains


Hong Kong’s Izzue debuts at London Fashion Week with catchy cross-cultural vibes

Capital Gains


1分快三玩法Hong Kong’s Izzue debuts at London Fashion Week with catchy cross-cultural vibes

Culture > Talk of the Town


 

Capital Gains 

February 26, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

1分快三玩法Watched by a glittering group of celebrities and influencers from singer Lily Allen, designer John Rocha and artist Oscar Murillo to fashion writer Susie Bubble and Korean pop icon Kim Jae-hwan of Wanna One, Hong Kong brand Izzue, the first local brand to stage an on-schedule fashion show at London Fashion Week, brought stylish escapism to the runway with its AW19 debut in the British capital on The Strand. 

In keeping with the I.T-owned brand’s “Live it Real” motto, the show, featuring womenswear and menswear across Izzue’s key items (#izzueessentials1分快三玩法) of stripe tees, sweatshirts, trench coats, down puffers, bikers and shirt/blazers, reflected the difficulties of living in the now – questioning what drives feelings of insecurity or displacement in today’s youth, and how they can best equip themselves to combat such emotions. 

The cuts and form were deconstructed and the show prefaced the notion of re-purposing, reconstructing and re-using clothes as a way of reacting to life’s challenges and outcomes.  Experimental PVC made its way into tailoring and a utilitarian military theme underscored the sense of modern urban combat. 

Luminous Georgian artist Shalva Nikvashvili conjured sculptural and conceptual headware to accentuate the sense of the wearer’s journey and purpose while navigating the metropolitan wilderness.  “We’re incredibly proud to be doing this in London,” said Deborah Cheng, chief commercial officer of I.T Group, “as the city has been such an influence on the development of the Izzue brand.” Here’s to SS20. 

Images provided to China Daily

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Pet Shop Boys


Pet Shop Boys


Culture > Talk of the Town


 

Pet Shop Boys

February 25, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

The famed English synth-pop duo of Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe, aka the Pet Shop Boys, return to Hong Kong for one night only in March. With a music career that spans 13 studio albums (the latest being 2016’s Super) and 42 Top 30 singles in the UK, the band’s profound influence on the pop music industry is indisputable. As the magnetic frontman of The Killers, Brandon Flowers, puts it: “Neil was blessed with one of the world’s most naturally eccentric and eternally authentic voices, while Chris retains an impenetrable cool behind his shades.” Any more accolades or ovations are in excess, as the duo have firmly established themselves as one of the most prominent electronic acts in the world. Fans from around the region are hotly anticipating The Super Tour, in which the boys will perform their greatest hits alongside more obscure tracks. To be frank, we can never get enough of “West End Girls”, “It’s a Sin” or “Heart”.

What Pet Shop Boys: The Super Tour

Where Hall 10, Asia World-Expo, Lantau

When1分快三玩法 March 28, 8pm

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