1分快三玩法

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Food & Drink


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Food & Drink


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Tonight We're Gonna Party Like It's 1929


1分快三玩法Jasper Morris, a Master of Wine and Berry Bros & Rudd’s Burgundy Director, shares his insights on the 2015 Burgundy vintage

Tonight We're Gonna Party Like It's 1929


Jasper Morris, a Master of Wine and Berry Bros & Rudd’s Burgundy Director, shares his insights on the 2015 Burgundy vintage

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

 

Tonight We’re Gonna Party Like It’s 1929

April 28, 2017 / by Jasper Morris

Every so often, the Big One comes along – a great vintage of Burgundy or Bordeaux that feels like a future legend, even while the grapes are being picked. That’s the story with the 2015 Burgundy vintage, which is just being released to an eager world at the moment.

Why is it so good? There’s nothing to beat a hot, dry summer for making great wine, as long as it’s not too hot, nor too dry. It looked as though 2015 may have been a touch too much of both, but fortunately a well-filled water table at the start of the season and showers at the right time in August avoided any problems – and the heat was a steady glow rather than an intermittent furnace. 

In fact, it was a relatively carefree growing season after difficult years from 2012 to 2014. There was no frost damage and only one major hailstorm (in Chablis) on the eve of the harvest. The flowering was early and took place rapidly in good weather conditions, though a naturally small bunch set, coupled with the dry conditions throughout most of the summer, limited the size of the harvest.

Picking began in late August, a date that used to be considered exceptionally early; there was only the very occasional August harvest in past centuries (such as 1893 and 1976). However, so far there have been four since the turn of the millennium (2003, ’07, ’11 and ’15) – and that’s certainly a statistic to support the theory of global warming. 

1分快三玩法Of these four precocious years, 2015 is the best – and probably the best in a generation, apart from the inimitable 2005. One feature of 2015 summer that may well have had a positive effect on the wines was the extraordinary luminosity: consistently clear, bright skies, rather than the heavy, lowering heat.

Chardonnay grapes were first to be picked; growers reported golden bunches that tasted ripe, with adequate sugars and lowish acidities. While first thoughts were that this would be a red wine vintage (which it certainly is), the whites are turning out far superior to what might have been, given the long, hot summer. Whereas in 2009 there are some great wines from the small proportion of producers who picked early enough, in 2015 the great majority made the right call – so there aren’t many clumsy wines. They’re full of fruit and flesh, yet with adequate acidity; most have a fine, fresh feel.

And what can we say about the reds? They’re fabulous. In many ways, they marry the concentration of 2005 with the juicy charm of 2010 – a combination that works very nicely in mathematical terms. The wines seem consistently successful across the range, with best value being delivered by the humbler appellations that haven’t suffered the price inflation of the grands crus. It’s never easy to equate one vintage with another, but veteran vigneron Michel Lafarge has the answer for 2015: it’s 1929 all over again!

Illustration: ©Berry Bros & Rudd

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Easter Eggs


Easter Eggs


Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Easter Eggs

March 31, 2017 / by Pierre Godeau

Maître chocolatier and “chocolate composer” Christian Constant has gathered Central America’s finest cacao for his 2017 Easter egg collection. Measuring an impressive 130cm to 190cm, you can discover these scrumptious works of art at his new Paris shop at 40 Rue des Écoles. (maisonconstant.com)

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Caveat Emptor


Philip Moulin, Berry Bros & Rudd’s fine wine quality and authentication manager, says that avoiding fakes in the market is a matter of determining their provenance

Caveat Emptor


1分快三玩法Philip Moulin, Berry Bros & Rudd’s fine wine quality and authentication manager, says that avoiding fakes in the market is a matter of determining their provenance

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Caveat Emptor

March 31, 2017 / by Philip Moulin

In December 2013, the foundations of the global fine wine market were rocked to the core when a young Indonesian-Chinese wine collector, Rudy Kurniawan (born Zhen Wang Huang), was sentenced by a New York courthouse to ten years in prison for what the US legal system described as “mail and wire fraud”. In short, his crime was the selling of an estimated US$100 million worth of counterfeit wine between 2002 and 2012, when he was ultimately arrested at his home in Los Angeles. 

1分快三玩法Given that Kurniawan was essentially operating a cottage industry from his house, the scale of his crime is breathtaking. His fakes took several different forms, with the most basic technique involving the refills of genuine old bottles (often recovered from rubbish bins after grand tastings) with his own blends of cheaper wines, designed to mimic the real thing. As he became more confident, he took to counterfeiting labels of old, rare wines and sticking them on far inferior, younger bottles. 

1分快三玩法Kurniawan’s early fakes, while initially convincing, were often prone to spelling mistakes or simple errors in labelling law, which made them stand out. As his own knowledge of the subject grew, however, his labels became harder to tell apart from the real thing. His main route to market was through high-profile wine auctions, the two largest of which sold more than 16,000 bottles in 2006, worth some US$22 million in total. 

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If that one-man operation wasn’t scary enough, consider the potential scale of the fake wine problem in China. Between 2010 and 2014, an intrepid lawyer, Nick Bartman, travelled the length of the country to get an idea of the scale of counterfeit wine in what’s now the world’s fifth-largest wine importer. Bartman’s discoveries were remarkable, ranging from a PR company offering advice to counterfeiters on label reproduction to entire bottling plants churning out huge amounts of cheap swill that bore fake labels of more illustrious wines, usually from France. 

So how does the everyday buyer and consumer avoid falling prey to forgers? Much the same as what merchants must also do to avoid the same fate, it’s crucial to make certain, as far as you possibly can, exactly where your wine is coming from. Buying at auction is fine, but a little research is vital – and only trust the best auction houses. As a general rule, those merchants and auctioneers with the oldest names don’t want to jeopardise their long-held reputations for the sake of a quick buck. 

Forgers have long relied on the collector’s inability to see warning flags as they pursue their next trophy with myopic fervour. Don’t be too greedy – and be prepared to walk away. If that old bottle of burgundy you’re after has an unusually clean label for its age, be suspicious. You know the old saying: if it looks too good to be true…

Illustration: ©Berry Bros & Rudd

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Trip to Tiramisu World


While Hong Kong isn’t short on local sweets, the city’s food lovers have a particular penchant for a fine Italian dessert – specifically, tiramisu. Local diners regularly order it in cake form, as an ice cream or just about anything else tiramisu-flavoured to properly round off a meal. Join us on a journey to the fantastical land of Tiramisu World… 

Trip to Tiramisu World


While Hong Kong isn’t short on local sweets, the city’s food lovers have a particular penchant for a fine Italian dessert – specifically, tiramisu. Local diners regularly order it in cake form, as an ice cream or just about anything else tiramisu-flavoured to properly round off a meal. Join us on a journey to the fantastical land of Tiramisu World… 

Lifestyle > Food & Drink



Trip to Tiramisu World

February 24, 2017 / by Wang Yuke


Korean dessert brand Kiss the Tiramisu gives this Italian classic a chilly twist – as an ice cream. Experience a variety of flavours and textures as you tuck in, layer by layer. Topped with a coating of shaved chocolate chips and cocoa powder, the snowy ice cream isn’t overly frozen and almost melts in your mouth. Halfway through, you’ll be teased by a smattering of powdered crunchy cookies. The kicker is the mascarpone cheese-flavoured cream underneath, which is aromatically rich.

Price: HK$43
Where to eat: Kiss the Tiramisu, Shop 15, R/F, Citylink, Sha Tin
Kiss the Tiramisu, Shop 1001A, 1/F,Phase 1, Tuen Mun Town Plaza,Tuen Mun


Passion by Gérard Dubois serves up a more sophisticated version that caters to serious tiramisu lovers. The ladyfinger base seems to be heavily soaked in rum and coffee, as the subtle aftertaste of espresso tends to linger on the tongue. Notably, the well-soaked base isn’t soggy, which is considered a key factor when gauging a well-composed tiramisu. The mascarpone custard in the middle layer is rich, but neither too heavy nor too sweet.

Price: HK$43
Where to eat: Passion by Gérard Dubois, Shop 11, Level 4, Langham Place, Mong Kok
Passion by Gérard Dubois, Shop G12, Lee Garden One, Causeway Bay


1分快三玩法From the chocolate speciality shop Lucullus, the Tiramisu Deluxe Cup is a refreshing delight on your palate. Under a thin sprinkling of cocoa powder, the cream-rich custard is giddily soft and light – and as smooth as a baby’s skin. Although normally served as a dessert, it can also serve as a palate cleanser during a heavy meal. One note: the traditional coffee-soaked ladyfinger is replaced by a thin layer of coffee-flavoured sponge cake, which would be better if the Marsala wine was stronger in the custard.

Price: HK$39
Where to eat: Lucullus, Shop 6, Basement 2, Langham Place, Mong Kok
Lucullus, Shop 4B, Level LG, iSquare, Tsim Sha Tsui


Images: Wang Yuke

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Caviar Creations


1分快三玩法Sturia’s You & Me is a romantic match with a lovely Sauternes

Caviar Creations


1分快三玩法Sturia’s You & Me is a romantic match with a lovely Sauternes

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Caviar Creations

February 24, 2017

Top French caviar producer Sturia has a treat for two: You & Me, a Siberian sturgeon caviar farmed in Aquitaine. With its sensual aromas, You & Me is a delicious declaration of romance as its firm grains roll and burst in the mouth, releasing surprisingly delightful hazelnut flavours. Keep it in Bordeaux and savour this caviar with a Sauternes such as Promesse de Rabaud-Promis – the caviar’s salty, iodine flavours harmonise impeccably with the sweetness of this liqueur-like wine, while its hazelnut notes strike a perfect balance with the wine’s citrus notes. You & Me and Promesse de Rabaud-Promis – an ideal marriage.

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Springtime in the Kitchen


Four questions for Jacky Tauvry, the chef de cuisine at Pierre, the Mandarin Oriental Hong Kong’s two Michelin-starred restaurant

Springtime in the Kitchen


Four questions for Jacky Tauvry, the chef de cuisine at Pierre, the Mandarin Oriental Hong Kong’s two Michelin-starred restaurant

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Springtime in the Kitchen

February 24, 2017 / by Louis-Marie Delmas

Is spring truly a time of anticipation for chefs?

1分快三玩法Cooks always love springtime because it’s the season of new vegetables, herbs, flowers and the first mushrooms. 

What are the star foods of springtime and how do you prepare them? 

Asparagus, morel mushrooms and new ratte potatoes from Noirmoutier are the queens of springtime. Then there are the miniature leeks and miniature carrots – all those little things that are so tasty and so pretty, and that bring such colour and freshness to dishes. The three main asparagus varieties are green, white and purple. This year, we’re serving green asparagus with a piece of sea bream cooked slowly in citrus butter, and a salad made with fresh spring herbs like burnet, chervil, parsley and lemon balm. We also do a cream of Noirmoutier potatoes with a grapefruit reduction that we serve with poultry or fish. We cook morels in cream with all the new vegetables – it’s very refreshing. 

What are your criteria when selecting your ingredients? 

We’re a French restaurant, so we work only with small French producers we know, who respect the product and the environment. For example, we select asparagus from growers in Touraine or Pertuis, which are France’s asparagus capitals. The asparagus has a unique, delicately sweet taste. It’s important because most of the asparagus you find in supermarkets here is industrially produced – the quality is totally different.

Have you got an asparagus recipe to share with our readers?

A very simple recipe is to peel some green asparagus stalks, cook them for five minutes in boiling water and then cool them in ice water. Arrange thin slices of comté on top and brown under the grill of your oven – delicious.

Photo: Philippe Dova

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Top Dollar


Jasper Morris, a Master of Wine and Berry Bros & Rudd’s director of Burgundy, explores why some wines are worth paying extra for

Top Dollar


1分快三玩法Jasper Morris, a Master of Wine and Berry Bros & Rudd’s director of Burgundy, explores why some wines are worth paying extra for

Lifestyle > Food & Drink



Top Dollar

above illustration: © Berry Bros.

December 9, 2016 / by Jasper Morris / Illustration: Billy Wong

There have been quasi-academic studies that appear to prove
that most people can’t tell the difference between a cheap bottle of wine and an expensive one; indeed, they frequently prefer the less expensive option.

There’s a reason for that – and it’s most easily expressed as the difference between a branded wine and a destination. Branded wines are made to a specific price and style, and those responsible know what works in the market. There’s no need for wines of this sort to have any discernible link with a place of origin, though the imprint of a particular grape variety is usually required.

At this point, wine is an alcoholic beverage performing a social function; it may or may not be a pleasure in its own right. Psychologically, once we start paying more for a bottle of wine, we should expect something more in return – a flavour profile that drives a specific sense of enjoyment and perhaps a link to a particular place. It’s not just that we have discovered over the years that great pinot noir and chardonnay are made in Burgundy, cabernet and merlot blends in Bordeaux, shiraz in Barossa, sauvignon blanc in Marlborough and so on – when we taste one of these excellent wines, there’s that magical sense of recognition when it delivers exactly what we expect.

So the elegant red fruit notes combined with violets is not just a delightful taste, but the essence of Chambolle-Musigny in Burgundy. Cedarwood and cigar boxes have been the olfactory triggers for the wines of Bordeaux’s Pauillac for generations of drinkers. As soon as you put your nose in the glass, you start to smile.

1分快三玩法However, this all depends on drinking the wine at the right time. The inexpensive branded bottle is going to be purchased and drunk within days (or possibly hours) of going on sale, shortly after bottling – either way, it’ll be ready for its fate. 

1分快三玩法But a finely crafted bottle from a famous region needs time in bottle for its full expression to mature, for the tannins or acidity to fade, for the complexity of its bouquet and the nuances of texture to emerge. These are the things we really care about. Great vintages often take longer to come round than lesser ones, so a fine wine drunk at the wrong time can certainly disappoint.

Then we get to the seriously expensive fine and rare wines. Those two adjectives, “fine” and “rare”, are often used in tandem – and they tell a significant part of the story. Clearly a very expensive wine needs to be very fine, but there is also a cachet to its rarity. Being the owner of a rare bottle to which other people cannot aspire may be a considerable source of status and satisfaction, but it’s a pleasure that will be paid for. The fact that only one barrel (of 300 bottles) of Christophe Roumier’s Le Musigny is produced each year doesn’t make it intrinsically a better wine – just a more expensive one.

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Bubbling Over


Champagne Nicolas Deneux is the world’s first sommelier-branded champagne

Bubbling Over


Champagne Nicolas Deneux is the world’s first sommelier-branded champagne

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Bubbling Over

December 9, 2016 / by Pierre Godeau

Serving as a sommelier from the age of 19, Nicolas Deneux worked in some of the finest restaurants in Paris (including La Tour d’Argent,
1分快三玩法Le Meurice and Plaza Athénée) before coming to Hong Kong in 2009. Today, he’s the director of wine at Nomad Dining and a partner in the group. One of the city’s top sommeliers, he has worked ceaselessly to promote champagnes produced by the winegrowers themselves – known as “champagnes de vignerons”. At age 31, he has also launched an eponymous champagne brand.

1分快三玩法As his mother lived just 45 minutes from the first-growth vineyards of Champagne, Deneux frequently explored the region, ultimately falling in love with its champagnes de vignerons. “I’m not the kind of sommelier who learns everything from books,” he explains. “My idea was to go out to the vineyards as often as possible – and the Parisian establishments where I worked were closed on weekends, so I used the opportunity to explore.”

Hired in 2009 as the chief sommelier at Spoon by Alain Ducasse in the InterContinental Hong Kong, Deneux quickly added champagnes de vignerons by the glass to the menu. “Eight years ago, champagne was a taboo subject,” he recalls. “Only a few big brands were known and when I served obscure brands, customers reacted badly because there was still a need for label recognition. However, today, it’s exactly the opposite.” 

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During a tasting with winegrower Erick de Sousa, the duo decided to create a champagne for Asian markets. Their mission was to create an accessible bottle in terms of taste and price. “Above all, I didn’t want to make a wine that was by sommeliers, for sommeliers – meaning one that was expensive, technical, complicated and not necessarily drinkable,” explains Deneux. “We developed a wine with a low sugar content – seven grams per bottle – to bring out something fresh and with the notion of the Chardonnay terroir.”

For the first blend, 3,000 bottles were produced. The understated design features a fun logo of a little orange ewe. “The ewe was a joking reference to my origins, both to the terroir and to the family farm in the Lot, where we raise ewes and where I spent my childhood. Also, it’s one of the few French words my girlfriend knows,” says Deneux.

Champagne Nicolas Deneux Blanc de Blancs Premier Cru is currently available in Hong Kong and South China, with plans to launch in 2017 in France, Australia, the US and Hungary. A rosé blend will soon be added to the range, while in 2019 there are plans to release the 2015 vintage, already known to be an exceptional year.

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Lovely Log


In France and other French-speaking countries, Christmas dinner wouldn’t be complete without a traditional bûche de Noël, also known as a Yule log, for dessert

Lovely Log


1分快三玩法In France and other French-speaking countries, Christmas dinner wouldn’t be complete without a traditional bûche de Noël, also known as a Yule log, for dessert

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Lovely Log

December 9, 2016 / by Philippe Dova / Photo: Roy Liu

1分快三玩法It may seem like a rather odd name for a cake – the “logs” on which the French feast at Christmas are not produced by lumberjacks, but there is a connection. Starting in the Middle Ages and continuing down the centuries, it was customary to light a big fruitwood log in the family fireplace on Christmas Eve and let it burn very slowly until New Year’s Day, in the belief that this would guarantee good harvests in the year ahead. Traditional fireplaces were gradually replaced by cast-iron stoves in the 19th century and then by central heating in the 20th century, so the custom died out.

The first edible incarnation of the bûche de Noël was created in 1879 by pastry chef Antoine Charabot, but the bûche we know today – a rolled sponge cake filled with chocolate, coffee, vanilla or Grand Marnier-flavoured buttercream, covered with more buttercream, and embellished with sweets and decorative objects – did not make its appearance in pastry shop windows until 1945. Today this iconic pastry has evolved to include ice cream and fruit mousse variations, and has become popular around the world.

“I remember when I was a child, there were bûches de Noël in all of the Hong Kong pastry shops,” recalls Tracy Chow. The owner of Pomme in Wan Chai, she holds a diploma from Le Cordon Bleu in Paris. This year, Tracy has created two traditional bûches and an unusually flavoured Christmas cake. “Because chocolate is always popular, I wanted to make one [pictured above]. I’m using Valrhona dark chocolate – for me it’s the best for baking. As for chestnut, you don’t see many logs made from that and winter is certainly the season for it. Besides the logs, I also wanted to have a festive cake, so I made a green-tea Christmas tree cake.”

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Alexandre Brusquet, head pastry chef at Pierre in Hong Kong’s Mandarin Oriental, set himself the challenge of creating a bûche that was light and not overly sweet – although it wasn’t on the Christmas menu at home when he was growing up. “I spent Christmases at my grandparents’ in Nîmes, and in the south of France the tradition on December 24 was a taste of 13 different desserts. There were mandarins, oranges, candied fruits, dates and chocolate truffles, and we would eat a bit of each, which was thought to bring good luck,” he reminisces.

Brusquet’s “Grand Dessert” for Pierre consists of six items – until December 26, it will also include an intricate bûche de Noël created by the chef. “I’m not a big fan of the traditional buttercream bûche, which I feel is much too heavy after a Christmas dinner,” he explains. “Every year, I try to make something that adds a fresh note. Last year it was an orange mousse bûche, but this year I wanted to do something exotic.”

1分快三玩法Brusquet’s unique take on the bûche de Noël is a sponge filled with coconut mousse blended with white chocolate and Malibu liqueur, a passion-fruit meringue dacquoise, a Joconde almond biscuit, lemon marmalade and a centre of caramelised pear. The icing is made with passion fruit and the bûche is covered in dark chocolate “bark”, which is made by pouring 72% cocoa chocolate onto a cylinder to give it its shape. 

Once the chocolate has hardened, Brusquet uses a metal brush to give it the appearance of a real tree trunk. Finally, for the chocolate mushrooms on the bark, he has used real mushrooms for the moulds. It’s supremely artistic, sophisticated and a delicious way to celebrate Christmas.

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Runway Eats


Luxury fashion labels have branched out to launch dining ventures in Asia and around the world

Runway Eats


Luxury fashion labels have branched out to launch dining ventures in Asia and around the world

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Runway Eats

October 28, 2016 / by Bei Li

Upper image: Thomas’s, Burberry, London

Cafe Dior by Pierre Hermé, Seoul

Cafe Dior by Pierre Hermé, Seoul

1分快三玩法Fashion and food have always enjoyed a sophisticated friendship, from fashion-themed afternoon teas to luxury label chocolates. This year during the various Fashion Weeks, food pop-ups were all the rage. More permanently, fashion-branded restaurants around the world epitomise the essence of luxury – and are the perfect locations for you to showcase the current season’s leading looks. 

1分快三玩法One of the most established luxury labels with a culinary arm is Armani. Giorgio Armani made his first foray into the world of food and beverage in 1989, and the brand now has restaurants and bars in key fashion cities including Tokyo, Milan and Dubai. In Hong Kong, there’s the restaurant Armani/Aqua as well as the Armani/Privé bar and club, which boasts stunning views of Central from its rooftop terrace; the brand also has a delicious chocolate line. 

Vivienne Westwood is another top brand with a culinary outlet in Hong Kong: the Vivienne Westwood Cafe in Harbour City, well known for its high-tea sets, is the brand’s second branch, the first being in the K11 mall in Shanghai. Also in Shanghai, discerning travellers can drop by 1921 Gucci – the world’s first Gucci restaurant, which also features a chocolate bar and a cafe.

For shoppers searching for a chic beach retreat with fashionable food to match, the Cavalli Ibiza Restaurant & Lounge is hard to beat, with Italian
1分快三玩法cuisine and that signature Roberto Cavalli animal-print decor. Fans of bold prints can also rejoice (and imbibe) at the Vanitas restaurant, housed in the Palazzo Versace on Australia’s Gold Coast, while they enjoy lagoon views and a striking 13-metre painting depicting Gianni Versace’s life. 

Cavalli Ibiza Restaurant & Lounge

Cavalli Ibiza Restaurant & Lounge

Fashion brands are particularly keen on opening cafes in their flagship stores. Cafe Dior by Pierre Hermé is a chic spot in the brand’s Seoul flagship store in the upscale Cheongdam district, with macarons and pastries galore. Last year, Burberry opened its first café, housed in its Regent Street flagship store in London. Thomas’s is named after the brand’s founder, Thomas Burberry, and it serves distinctly British fare with ingredients sourced from local farmers. 

1分快三玩法There’s a Ralph’s Coffee shop on the second floor of Ralph Lauren’s flagship store in New York City, with a vintage truck popping up around the city for New Yorkers to get their caffeine fix. Also a trailblazer on the fashion-meets-food front, the brand has gourmet outlets in several cities worldwide, including Ralph’s in Paris, the Polo Bar in New York City and the RL Restaurant in Chicago. 

Milan is home to several fashion-focused restaurants, such as Prada’s stunning Bar Luce, designed by fashion’s favourite film director, Wes Anderson. There’s also Ceresio 7 Pools & Restaurant, a glamourous Milanese rooftop location from Dean and Dan Caten, the identical-twin designers behind Dsquared2. 

Beige Alain Ducasse Tokyo

Beige Alain Ducasse Tokyo

At the Beige Alain Ducasse Tokyo restaurant, a chic collaboration with Chanel, refined French cuisine is served up in immaculate surroundings. It’s designed by Chanel retail architect Peter Marino and the brand’s signature motifs even make an appearance in the food. Tokyo is also home to Il Ristorante, a restaurant and bar from Italian brand Bulgari. The kitchen is headed up by executive chef Luca Fantin, the only Italian chef in Japan with one Michelin star. At the brand’s Omotesando location, shoppers can also relax with a coffee at Il Cafe before sampling the brand’s chocolate line at Il Cioccolato.

1分快三玩法And for those who want to enjoy the combined worlds of fashion magazines and cuisine, the GQ Bar in Dubai and the Vogue Cafe in Moscow are the perfect way to round out a fashion-meets-food global tour.

When it comes to luxury fashion and luxury eats, the two clearly go hand in hand – or, should we say, fork in mouth.

Images: Pierre Monetta; Armani/Privé; Bulgari Ginza Tower Tokyo; Bulgari Omotesando; Cavalli Ibiza Restaurant & Lounge; Cafe Dior by Pierre Hermé, Seoul; Thomas’s, Burberry, 121 Regent Street, London

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