1分快三玩法

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In Praise of Chia


1分快三玩法Get hip to the magic of the chia seed with a delicious pudding recipe

In Praise of Chia


1分快三玩法Get hip to the magic of the chia seed with a delicious pudding recipe

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

In Praise of Chia

May 29, 2019 / by Howard Elias

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1分快三玩法If you’ve ever lived in North America, you’re likely familiar with Chia Pets, those kitschy terracotta figurines in the shape of animals, trees, movie characters and even US presidents. As the TV commercial tells it, you simply soak your piece of pottery in water, spread the chia seeds on top and then watch them sprout green “fur” over the next week. As a kid, having a low-maintenance fluffy pet to look after is great fun – but did you know that you can eat chia seeds too? They’re incredibly healthy, as they are a rich source of protein, omega-3 fatty acids, the B vitamins and more than a few essential minerals… and they’re low in calories, too. Chia is also hydrophilic, absorbing up to 12 times its weight in liquid – and that’s important to know if your bowels have been moving slowly.

The chia plant, Salvia hispanica, is a species of the mint family that is native to Central America. Historians believe that chia was as important a food crop for the Aztecs as maize. Today, chia is grown from Arizona to Argentina and comes in two varieties: black and white, both of which have the same nutritional value. 

1分快三玩法Fortunately for us in Hong Kong, chia seeds are now widely available at health food stores and online shops. Because they’re tiny, a little goes a long way – but because they’re so delicious and nutritious, you may find yourself ordering a few packages at a time before long. They can be sprinkled on top of your morning cereal or rice congee, or thrown into your smoothie for an added protein boost. Unlike flaxseed, which needs to be ground up before being eaten in order to benefit from the nutrients, chia seeds are easily absorbed and digested whole. There have been reports, however, of people choking on them because of their hydrophilic quality. To get around that, be sure to drink a glass of water after eating chia seeds or soak them in liquid for about 15 minutes before you eat them. They’ll start to develop a gelatinous coating, which will aid in their digestion.

1分快三玩法My new go-to dessert recipe is chia pudding. It’s healthy, simple to make and amazingly delicious. If your family is finicky about trying out new healthy foods, don’t tell them it’s chia until after they’ve taken their first bite.

Chia Pudding with Fruit Compote

1½ cups of milk (substitute soya milk, almond milk or coconut milk as desired)

½ cup chia seeds

2 tbsp maple syrup (or less, to taste)

1分快三玩法1 tsp vanilla extract

3 cups blueberries, strawberries, peaches, nectarines or other fruits

2 tsp white sugar (or less, to taste)

1 good glug (as Jamie Oliver calls it) of balsamic vinegar

  • In a bowl, add all the ingredients for the chia pudding. Mix together and refrigerate for a few hours.
  • In a pot, add all the ingredients for the fruit compote. Mix together over low heat until the juices run from the fruit and start to thicken. Pour into a second bowl and refrigerate for a few hours.
  • After the mixtures have sufficiently chilled, add the chia mixture to the top of the fruit compote and return to the refrigerator until you want to eat it.
  • The pudding will stay fresh for about five days – but it tastes so good, it will probably be eaten well before then.
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The Golden Gates


What’s the most beautiful expression of the chardonnay grape? Meet Anne Moreau, preaching the gospel of Chablis

The Golden Gates


What’s the most beautiful expression of the chardonnay grape? Meet Anne Moreau, preaching the gospel of Chablis

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

The Golden Gates

May 15, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

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1分快三玩法Few libations espouse such a linear narrative as Chablis, a Burgundian white (produced exclusively from the chardonnay grape in the northernmost Chablis region) that hits the back of the palate like a bullet fired from a Walther PPK. It’s flinty, minerally, fresh and can even evoke the notion of wet stone. There’s none of the endless complexity and variety of its red, full-bodied cousin, either. Famed French author Colette, who was born in Burgundy, called wine an “energetic and exhilarating friend, a potion,” but we have no evidence (at least not yet) that she consumed or even ordered Chablis through her negociant, with whom she shared a lifelong correspondence. 

Coincidentally, long before author Ian Fleming had his fictional 007 ordering Bollinger and Dom Pérignon, British writer E Phillips Oppenheim – widely regarded as the earliest writer of spy fiction – featured protagonists espionaging their way through days of lifestyle luxury, punctuated by profusions of Chablis. “A Chablis of the best, Henry,” effuses one character in Tales of Mystery & Espionage; “The finest Chablis with the oysters” is the request in Clowns and Criminals1分快三玩法; and then there’s this remarkable exchange: “With the Petites Demoiselles, Monsieur le Prince, one should drink a Vieux Chablis – le Montrachet 1911.”

1分快三玩法Sharing her thoughts on Chablis is Anne Moreau, a member of the Bourgogne Wine Board for the last decade and the board of directors of the Grands Jours de Bourgogne since 2017. Moreau visited Hong Kong during Bourgogne Week; aside from her pedigree in wine, she’s married to the sixth-generation scion of Domaine Louis Moreau, which produces a range of Chablis. 

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To what extent might Chablis be a good entry point to wine? 

I do feel that Chablis is easy-drinking. It delivers freshness and spiciness, but not too much. It’s more a wine that refreshes the palate; it’s stylish, elegant and has finesse, but is not overly complex. 

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Domaine Louis Moreau makes a wine with the name Finesse. It sounds like a perfume. Could this be indicative of a new trend – or a label such as “Chablis Poison”? 

[laughs]1分快三玩法 Perfume names for wine?! We do think it’s interesting to look at the vocabulary they used in the perfume industry in the past, and see how easily we can appropriate those ideas and apply them to wine. We have made Finesse for more than ten years now. We tried to find a word that was accurate for each of our cuvées. “Finesse” is one we would use for Chablis – and perhaps “freshness” for our Petit Chablis. I think we use many words such as finesse, elegance and purity. They’re more on the feminine side than the masculine side. I don’t know if that’s perhaps because we have more women in the wine business today.

What are the greatest challenges for Chablis producers at this moment? 

1分快三玩法First, I would say it’s a problem of volume. Second, it would be environmentally friendly processes. New generations of winemakers are very concerned about that issue. And because of the weather we have, it can be tricky and also very dynamic, which makes it interesting. 

How many natural or organic growers are there in the region?

For Bourgogne, it’s about 12% doing it the organic way. In Chablis, because of global warming, more and more people are going bio. We do believe in high environmental value, which includes all steps from farming to vineyard, and to the cellar work and how you sell the wine. Like a 360-degree certification, it covers all the steps. It’s not bio, though. It’s a more in-between state that takes everything into account: weather, climate and other challenges. 

Can you give a tangible example of how weather is changing your approach?

We want to leave our children land and grapes in good health. So sometimes it’s difficult and more labour-intensive, but it’s worth every moment. It’s very tangible and it’s very dynamic

For example, with the 2016 vintage, we had an early spring, so the grapes grew early, and then there was a heavy spring frost. In the past, even though we had spring frost, the winter had been long, so the plant hadn’t grown. Now when the spring frost arrives, it’s damaging the grapes earlier on. 

1分快三玩法We see grapes mature sooner – by the end of August or early September – so you harvest in better, drier conditions, and bring grapes into the cellar in better condition. So it’s good, but also bad. 

And we aren’t certified, but we are organic. We’re going more towards this high-value environmental quality with bees, et cetera… It’s more work because you have to go into the fields more often and need more people. But it’s rewarding – and you can’t go back. 

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Every single grape is now pampered, like couture. 

1分快三玩法Yes, but it’s not only a demand from consumers. It’s also now a philosophy that winemakers are developing and believing in. That’s because we want to leave our children land and grapes in good health. So sometimes it’s difficult and more labour-intensive, but it’s worth every moment. It’s very tangible and it’s very dynamic, and it does encourage people to go further and explore new techniques. 

What are the biggest misconceptions people have about Chablis? 

Some people still think Chablis isn’t made from the chardonnay grape, though it’s fewer today. That’s still the biggest misconception. Chablis is 100% chardonnay and we cannot use anything else. That’s what makes it so French – and so awkward. [laughs] 

One priority of this visit is to promote some of the lesser-known Chablis appellations. Which would be your top three?

1分快三玩法Rully, Saint-Bris and Saint-Aubin.

Do the Chinese own any vineyards in Chablis?

Not right now – the only thing they own near Chablis is the football club at Auxelles [AJ Auxerre]. That’s it. For Chinese people, the colour red is very important. They appreciate Chablis, but they aren’t yet super-interested in it. 

Could you perhaps sell the drink on its golden colour? 

Yes! We like that. The golden gates of Burgundy – after all, you enter Burgundy via Chablis. 

Images provided to China Daily

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Rech ’n’ Roll


At the InterContinental Hong Kong, Alain Ducasse’s French coastal tour menus are invitations to pure piscatorial pleasure

Rech ’n’ Roll


1分快三玩法At the InterContinental Hong Kong, Alain Ducasse’s French coastal tour menus are invitations to pure piscatorial pleasure

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Rech ’n’ Roll

April 17, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Image above: In Hong Kong, Rech boasts stunning views over Victoria Harbour

Rech’s executive chef, Guillaume Katola

1分快三玩法Rech’s executive chef, Guillaume Katola

Grilled sea scallops with raw and cooked ceps

Grilled sea scallops with raw and cooked ceps

1分快三玩法It’s clear that Alain Ducasse is no ordinary chef or entrepreneur. From his gourmet space food for NASA to his Coco Chanel-influenced Beige restaurant in Tokyo, he’s always been ahead of the curve. And unlike the majority of his highly visible culinary peers, whose actions have focused on globalisation, Ducasse’s message has been the antithesis. “I think in the future, every chef will try to preserve their identity – the French, the English, the Japanese,” he says. “It’s the opposite of globalisation. You have to be global, but stay local. Preserving the difference is what keeps the diversity alive.” 

Which is exactly what you’ll feel when you dine at the InterContinental Hong Kong’s Michelin-starred Rech by Alain Ducasse. The restaurant has been charting a voyage along the coast of France, showcasing the best produce and regional specialities with a series of five-course menus (HK$1,288) over the last two months, which concludes at the end of April. 

1分快三玩法From top-notch French oysters and seafood from the waters off Normandy to a wide variety of premium crustaceans and fish along the beautiful French coastline, Rech’s new executive chef, Guillaume Katola, is sourcing the best seasonal products for each episode along this Coastal Tour de France. Katola shares his culinary passion for regionally inspired dishes by using the best seafood and fish from Normandy, as well as regional produce with appellation d’origine contrôlée (AOC) certification, including carrots from Créances.

Most of the fish and shellfish at Rech hails from France (especially Brittany) from small, independent fishermen who are strongly involved in the protection of natural resources. The Jégo brothers’ trade – established more than 20 years ago in Etel, the ancient tuna port in Morbihan, Brittany – provides Rech with extra-fresh ingredients and uses fishing techniques that are respectful of the environment. 

Highly aware of the protection of the marine balance, Giles Jégo rigorously keeps track of quotas, sizes, reproductive seasons and tidal movements. He explains, “The selection comes primarily from what the sea bestows us day to day.” The fish he selects for the Rech restaurants in Paris and Hong Kong are line-caught in small fishing boats whose outings are limited to three hours, enabling them to bring the fish back to the quays in the light of dawn, still alive.

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Grey mullet carpaccio and sea urchin

Grey mullet carpaccio and sea urchin

1分快三玩法Katola also buys from other small independent fishmongers in Brittany who similarly source the very best fish and shellfish while being protective of the environment. “All of our fish is line-caught by fishermen using small boats,” he says. “This fish is fresher and of a better quality than fish that is caught by net on large fishing boats, which stay out at sea and store the fish for longer before it makes its way to the market.”

For more than a decade, Katola has worked with Ducasse, most recently as executive chef at The Grill at The Dorchester in London; he’s also worked at the Jules Verne Restaurant atop the Eiffel Tower, at Benoit and at Ore at Château de Versailles. “My approach in the kitchen is seasonal, using the freshest products to create dishes that reflect the time of year,” says Katola. “I’ve learned to always keep the ingredients in as natural a state as possible, bringing out their best flavour without taking away from their raw beauty. I’m also mindful in the kitchen of the ever-evolving world and working with respect to the environment in everything I do.”

That much is evident as one succumbs to the five-course La Normandie d’Alain Ducasse menu. Among the highlights are the Saint-Michel Oyster gratinated with Normandy cider; seared sea scallops; carrots from Créances (the sandy soils of the commune are fertilised with seaweed and it is the only carrot with its own AOC); the sublime Dieppoise-style sole fillet, in which button mushrooms and pink and grey shrimp mesh with a creamy white sauce; and Camembert – suffice it to say that nobody does it quite like Rech. The finale comes by way of flambéed crêpes with Calvados – two specialities from the Normandy region, the latter being an apple brandy. 

If you can’t make it to Rech by April’s end, worry not. There’s still chance to redeem yourself and enlighten your palate at Rech, where the tour continues. From June to July, the restaurant will feature a Riviera menu; one from Brittany for August and September; and for October and November, the lesser-known Aquitaine, whose capital is Bordeaux, with freshly harvested seasonal produce. 

Some things are just instinctively right – and Rech is one of them. If you love seafood, you’ll adore this piscatorial emporium. It’s the difference that keeps the diversity alive and keeps those taste buds tingling. 

Images provided to China Daily; ©Pierre Monetta (In Hong Kong, Rech boasts stunning views over Victoria Harbour)

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Going Against the Flow


1分快三玩法Champagne house Ruinart’s collaboration with Brazilian artist Vik Muniz is just one way the brand continues to push the creative envelope 

Going Against the Flow


1分快三玩法Champagne house Ruinart’s collaboration with Brazilian artist Vik Muniz is just one way the brand continues to push the creative envelope 

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Going Against the Flow

April 17, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Image above: Chardonnay Leaf,one of the works created by Vik Muniz as part of his Ruinart collaboration

The São Paulo-born artist

1分快三玩法The São Paulo-born artist

When champagne house Ruinart gave São Paulo-born artist Vik Muniz carte blanche to conjure his own creative vision of the venerable maison of bubbles, Muniz went straight to its foundations: the earth, the vineyards and the roots of the vines themselves – from which Frédéric Panaïotis, Ruinart’s cellar master, also takes inspiration for his craft. “I take it as a great positive that you can find this project a little bit edgy,” says Ruinart’s president, Frédéric Dufour. “One of the objects was to bring some modernity to the brand.”

1分快三玩法Ruinart is the dark horse of the champagne world – and yet a leading light. For a start, it’s the first established champagne house in the world. Forget what you thought you knew about Dom Pérignon divining bubbles in a cellar; Ruinart is 290 years old this year. “We are nearly 300 years old,” says Dufour. “So you need to shake the brand a little sometimes, but only insofar as it tells something that is important to the ongoing evolution of the story to us.”

The brand has also been pioneering in its close relationship with the art world, too. In 1896, for the first time in the history of champagne, Ruinart commissioned a talented young artist, Alphonse Mucha, to create an advert. “Art is in the house’s very nature,” says Dufour. “We are continuing our commitment to art by supporting major contemporary art fairs.” 

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Expect to see a bucket like this in the lounges of the world’s major art fairs

Expect to see a bucket like this in the lounges of the world’s major art fairs

And that art, like the roots at Ruinart and in Muniz’s project, run very deep. Ruinart partners with around 30 major art fairs around the world, and is now in its eighth year of partnership with Art Basel in Hong Kong as its Global Champagne Partner. The high-level inventory includes Art Basel (in Basel, Miami and Hong Kong), Frieze (New York and London), Paris Photo, Kyotographie, FIAC and many more. 

1分快三玩法But as with all matters Ruinart, it’s already doing something way cooler than all of its immediate competitors, yet you probably wouldn’t know it. “On top of the art fairs, we also support a programme for young artists and established artists,” explains Dufour. “Almost all of our Instagram posts, for example, show the work of young photographers that are part of our programme.” Who knew? Start following a three-century-old champagne company on Instagram and lo and behold, you’ll discover a variety of progressive young fashion photographers such as Nastasia Dusapin and Antoine Henault. 

1分快三玩法Meantime, self-described “low-tech illusionist” Muniz spent the harvest of 2018 in residence at Ruinart in Reims, initiating the “creative tension” that exists between man and nature in matters of champagne. He was surprised to discover the region has a harsh climate and a journey from hardship and adversity to wonder, so he created through his works “an ode to the power of nature and its creative flow”, much of it personified through the hands of Panaïotis. 

Back at the cellars in Reims, Muniz also created the permanent installation Flow Bottles. It comprises 1,400 bottles of Dom Ruinart, each filled with an advanced LED system. Stacked by hand, the bottles form a five-metre wall that displays moving images of spectators, taken by a device hidden within. “It’s almost like a form of temporary graffiti,” explains Muniz. 

Get with the roots, the plot and the maison. Go with the bubbles, the fun and the flow. And jump way ahead of culture’s curves with the 290-year-old French champagne house.

 
Flow bottles  by Vik Muniz

Flow bottles1分快三玩法 by Vik Muniz

Flow Hands , one of the works created by Vik Muniz as part of his Ruinart collaboration

Flow Hands, one of the works created by Vik Muniz as part of his Ruinart collaboration

Images provided to China Daily

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Easter Eats


Sample the seasonal spring delights at Dragon Noodles Academy

Easter Eats


Sample the seasonal spring delights at Dragon Noodles Academy

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Easter Eats

April 17, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Image above: The Easter Bunny and Spring Blessings

If you’re celebrating spring this month, Hong Kong-style, look no further than Dragon Noodles Academy in Central, which has created innovative new dishes and two new cocktails to up its seasonal offerings. 

1分快三玩法The light and bright menu items include toasted coconut corn cob (HK$59), presented in lollipop-like form with a coating of coconut flakes; marinated winter melon in blueberry sauce (HK$69), in which the melon balls are dipped in blueberry sauce and presented like a bunch of grapes; and baby cabbage florets with ham (HK$129). 

New to the menu are three specially created dim sum offerings: the crispy lobster puff (HK$79 per piece), which is a crunchy roll of lobster pastry painted with carrot juice to resemble a plump lobster tail; steamed shrimp dumplings (HK$59 for three pieces); and steamed crab and shrimp dumplings (HK$65 for three pieces). 

And don’t forget the seasonal cocktails, either. The Easter Bunny (HK$119) comprises Pimm’s, orange, cucumber and strawberry topped off with refreshing lemonade, while the Spring Blessings (HK$119) is composed of Malibu rum, banana, milk and white chocolate and is topped with soft marshmallows. Happy Easter – and happy eating! 

Images provided to China Daily

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Culture in a Box


The Japanese cultural practice of a packed meal (called “bento”) dates back to the 13th century. Today, it’s become a global phenomenon. Get into the art of making lunch

Culture in a Box


1分快三玩法The Japanese cultural practice of a packed meal (called “bento”) dates back to the 13th century. Today, it’s become a global phenomenon. Get into the art of making lunch

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

An elegant and complex bento by Yuka.Kuni

An elegant and complex bento by Yuka.Kuni

Culture in a Box

April 3, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Image above: One of Mizuka’s delicious bento creations

1分快三玩法Do you salivate when you see someone else’s lunch box turned into an edible work of art? If you answered yes, your favourites are probably on Instagram or other social media applications, where many people post pictures of their home-packed meal boxes – or as the Japanese call it, bento.

Famous for decorating meals with traditional Japanese curved meal boxes, popular blogger Mizuka (@xmizukax) shares her pretty bento pictures on Instagram every day. She usually moulds rice or vegetables into certain shapes, or accumulates a group of small rice rolls into one big flower. Mizuka also sometimes adds pink cherry blossoms and green leaves, bringing viewers a sense of spring.

Then there’s Li Ming, a mother who lives in Singapore with her two children and has made many adorable bento pieces for her blog Bento Monsters (@bentomonsters). Her Super Mario-shaped creation consists of strawberries, kiwi, rice and more. There are also bread, sandwiches, sushi and cupcakes featuring Hello Kitty, panda shapes and many other cute characters.

Another bento lover is Mike Kravanis (@omgiri). As a Disney fan and Disney Parks blog reader, Kravanis has been committed to cute bento after a trip to Japan several years ago. His creations for OMGiri take the form of famous Disney characters. Last September, he attended the Epcot International Food & Wine Festival at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida to share his thoughts about bento culture. Now we’re hungry…

A smiling bento by Obentomama140

A smiling bento by Obentomama140

OMGiri’s edible rendition of StellaLou, the cute bunny character at Tokyo DisneySea

OMGiri’s edible rendition of StellaLou, the cute bunny character at Tokyo DisneySea

Images: Instagram: @xmizukax (Mizuka); @omgiri; @yuka.kuni; @obentomama140

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Bordeaux’s Sweet Spot


1分快三玩法Sweet Bordeaux is having a moment that’s as close to immortality as wine gets

Bordeaux’s Sweet Spot


Sweet Bordeaux is having a moment that’s as close to immortality as wine gets

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Bordeaux’s Sweet Spot

March 6, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

1分快三玩法Liquid gold, the gold standard, luxury in a glass, wine’s Chanel No. 5, the silence that follows a piece by Mozart in which the listener remains suffused with the music – that’s Sauternes, the sweet white wine from France’s Bordeaux region. Made from sémillon, sauvignon blanc and sometimes muscadelle grapes, it’s having a magnificent moment in Asia. 

Hong Kong and China are now the world’s second-biggest market for this sweet Bordeaux elixir, according to Emma Baudry, who represents the Sweet Bordeaux association and travels annually to Hong Kong, Shanghai and Tokyo to promote the golden wonder in October and November. 

At Hong Kong’s most recent Wine and Dine festival, Baudry and the Sweet Bordeaux delegation sold more than 13,000 glasses over four days to the trade, visitors and amateur oenophiles. “The winemakers worked hard to explain the diversity of AOC [appellation d’origine contrôlée] to the young audience of Hong Kong,” explains Baudry. And so popular it was, she ran out of stock. 

Sauternes, and especially at Château d’Yquem, its most esteemed estate, is produced 40km upstream of Bordeaux in a region nestled between the left bank of the Garonne and the immense Landes forest. This noble area of about 2,200 hectares is divided among the villages of Sauternes, Bommes, Fargues, Preignac and Barsac. Although they can all properly claim the famous Sauternes appellation, the producers in Barsac are allowed to choose between the
1分快三玩法 Sauternes AOC and its sister appellation, Barsac AOC, which controls production in a very similar manner. 

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Sweet Bordeaux’s silver bullet, irony of ironies, is something called botrytis cinerea, commonly known as noble rot and capable of reducing a potential harvest of 40 hectares to just 18. Sémillon, sauvignon blanc and muscadelle grapes are left on the vine longer than a normal grape, the result of which makes the grapes raisin-like and shrivelled, and covered in a veil of fungus. Sauternes is one of the few regions where contamination happens frequently; in years when it doesn’t, the winemakers desist from producing. 

1分快三玩法Grapes are often picked one by one and winemakers may take batches for harvest each day as they assess their state of noble rot. Some estates harvest the sauvignon blanc as soon as it’s ripe to retain its aromatic finesse and acidity in order to produce fresh, more vigorous wines, while producers of heady, fuller-bodied Sauternes wait for the maximum amount of noble rot to set in. The natural concentration and selection process afford miniscule yields; a single vine produces just one to three glasses of this extraordinary wine. 

1分快三玩法Feared everywhere else, rot is providential and makes sweet Bordeaux, in all its iterations, a wine with extravagant complexity and variety; notes of orange, honey, apricot, peach, grapefruit, tangerine, pineapple, lemon, mango, lychee, cooked apple, ginger, vanilla, acacia blossom, walnut, almond, hazelnut, nutmeg, light and dark crème brûlée, and even saffron can all be evident. Really, no other wine bears such profundity in its sultry and seductive versatility.

So why isn’t it more commonly drunk? Sauternes and sweet Bordeaux have endured a curious agony-and-ecstasy of an image problem over the years, as a multitude of preconceptions have built up around the wine’s consumption. Among the most commonly misplaced notions are the following: that it’s only a dessert wine; that it can only be paired with foie gras, blue cheese and fruit desserts; that it’s expensive; that it’s wasteful, meaning not everyone wants to finish a bottle once opened; and that its sweetness has made it the preserve of women rather than the red-blooded male. 

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1分快三玩法Edward Narby, Berry Brothers & Rudd’s Hong Kong-based corporate account manager, has noticed a rising interest in Sauternes in China – “though not to the consumption levels of dry reds and whites,” he says. He identifies several reasons for the change. “The emphasis on food and wine-matching with Sauternes – it goes particularly well with aromatic and spicy dishes, with the sweetness acting as a great complement to spice, which can often overpower red wines.”

1分快三玩法Baudry and her cohorts have also paired sweet Bordeaux with seafood and found them to be agreeable to the broader Asian palate. “We have paired sweet Bordeaux with oysters, then lobster and finally a smoked saffron fish,” she says. “Very beautiful chords showed the guests the sweet wine’s pairing abilities thanks to its aromatic complexity, with a variety of textures and tastes.”

1分快三玩法Narby also believes the region’s dining culture matches well with the libation: “The tradition of Chinese dining, where lots of dishes are served at once, also works with sweet wine, as it is surprisingly versatile. There’s also a psychological edge to Sauternes – gold is such a positive colour, too.”

1分快三玩法But what about the commonly held belief that alpha males don’t touch the sweet stuff? “The notion of Sauternes being a more female-friendly libation is completely unfounded,” he says. “In tastings, I see that everyone enjoys these wines now. Real men drink rosé – they are drinking sweet Bordeaux, too.”

1分快三玩法It’s also an elixir with staying power on the practical level. “A sweet white Bordeaux, once opened, thanks to the higher levels of alcohol and acidity, will easily keep in the fridge for up to ten days… if you can resist it!” says Narby. At the more remarkable end of the preservation scale, US wine critic Robert Parker tasted an 1811 Château d’Yquem in 1996 and awarded it a perfect 100 points. The house of Dior even combined with d’Yquem in 2006 to create an anti-ageing cream that utilised sap from its vines. 

1分快三玩法Nicolas Sanfourche, who oversees 30 hectares of vines at Château Loupiac-Gaudiet, of which three hectares are dedicated to red wine and 27 to sweet white Loupiac, says both yes and no to Sauternes being considered a dessert wine. “It’s a dessert wine because it replaces the dessert at the end of the meal,” he says. “Never mix sweet wine and sugar, and if you really want to pair it with dessert, I prefer fresh fruits.” 

And on the point about the gender battle: “Soft drinks are sugared, too, but does that mean they are only for women as well?” he poses, noting that he sees more men in his cellar than women. Sanfourche also has two dancefloors in his cellar, where he invites 500 people and six DJs to while the weekend away. “The average age of the people is 25,” he adds. As of this month, he’s opened a space on the estate for Airbnb for those wanting a taste of the life more ambrosial. 

So what are you waiting for? Sweet Bordeaux doesn’t only taste sublime or match with all foods – it’s an anytime, anywhere libation, “People say sweet Bordeaux wine is only for the end of the year, a celebration, but my favourite time to drink it is next to the pool in the summer,” says Sanfourche. From here to eternity, go grab the sweeter life and aspire to iridescent immortality – a life Sauternal?

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Hong Kong’s Four Best Siu Mei Restaurants


1分快三玩法Want an authentic taste of Hong Kong? Check out some of the city’s best siu mei restaurants

Hong Kong’s Four Best Siu Mei Restaurants


Want an authentic taste of Hong Kong? Check out some of the city’s best siu mei restaurants

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Hong Kong’s Four Best Siu Mei Restaurants

March 6, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

1分快三玩法Ask a smattering of locals “What is Hong Kong’s signature cuisine?” and one of the top answers is certainly going to be siu mei (燒味). It’s a catch-all term for those mouth-watering roasted meats hanging in a restaurant’s front window, deliciously flavoured, cured and dripping with palatable juices. If this embodiment of scrumptious Canto cuisine has already triggered your appetite, read on to see our picks of the top siu mei restaurants in Hong Kong.

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Chop Chop

Where Shop 3, 18 Wang On Road, North Point 

This modern-style siu mei diner delivers traditional cuisine in a fun contemporary setting. Headed by chef Dai Lung, whose meticulous cooking inspired the char siu dish “sorrowful rice” that featured prominently in comedian Stephen Chow’s 1996 film The God of Cookery, Chop Chop’s signature dish is the roasted pork belly char siu rice (HK$80), acclaimed for its delicate texture, succulent meat and remarkable juiciness. Other standout dishes are the restaurant’s roast goose (HK$250/half) and crispy pork belly (HK$90/half-catty). 


One Goose

Where 1分快三玩法228 Ki Lung Street, Sham Shui Po 

1分快三玩法This innovative, newly opened restaurant is a diner that has set out to revolutionise the traditional siu mei. One Goose’s exceptional black pepper-seasoned roast goose ($120/half) is an impeccable blend of East and West, while its roast goose cooked with the indigenous Chinese herb Angelica sinensis ($120/half) is another standout with a distinct flavour. A top tip is to order the lower quarter of the goose (instead of the upper), since that’s where the meat is the most succulent and tender – it’s a well-known technique used by many locals. Coupling the appetising siu mei with the restaurant’s classically posh interiors, you’ll definitely enjoy this one-of-a-kind dining experience.


Yue Kee Restaurant

Where 9 Sham Hong Road, Sham Tseng 

Sham Tseng is well known for its roast goose restaurants – and Yue Kee is the most coveted spot. Since its establishment in 1958, Yue Kee has been run as a family business. Today, the second generation of ownership insists on creating its roast goose (HK$175/half) in the most traditional way possible, with the bird sourced from its eight privately owned farms in China. All the while maintaining a divine quality level and a steady supply, the restaurant char-grills the goose according to an exclusive recipe, which lends a distinctive smokiness, with a thin, crispy skin topping some seriously succulent meat.

Luen Fat Restaurant

Where 17 Market Street, Tsuen Wan 

As unfussy and unpretentious as it gets, Luen Fat is a time-honoured spot. The restaurant has retained a fierce group of loyal customers who come in droves for the shop’s delicious honey char siu (HK$105) and tantalising roast pork ribs (HK$120), always resulting in a long queue outside the restaurant during peak hours and Chinese festivals. Its simplistic layout and rustic furnishings embody the traditional siu mei restaurant.

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Hooked Up


Fishsteria casts its net wider with a new waterside restaurant in Kennedy Town

Hooked Up


1分快三玩法Fishsteria casts its net wider with a new waterside restaurant in Kennedy Town

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Hooked Up

February 20, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

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1分快三玩法In a harbour city such as Hong Kong, where fish is the staple diet of so many, it’s hard to catch and sustain the attentions and appetites of diners. But such has been the case with the restaurant, oyster and cocktail bar Fishsteria, run by chef-owner Gianni Caprioli. Having hooked the piscatorial taste buds of seafood lovers amid the hustle and bustle of Queen’s Road East in Wan Chai since its opening in 2015, it has now spawned a more laid-back sister restaurant, Fishsteria Waterside, in Kennedy Town. The new space, while still buzzy, overlooks the harbour and offers more easy-going dining, with floor-to-ceiling windows and bespoke light fittings crafted from the skeleton of a classic Italian rowboat. 

Much like the Wan Chai original, expect clams, oysters, crabs and bluefin tuna, as well as sustainable Italian seabass, Alaskan king crab, Dover sole from southern France and the oh-so-delectable calamari. Familiar dishes such as the famous Fishsteria lobster roll (HK$168) and tuna poke focaccia (HK$138) with lean tuna and creamy burrata, Italian tomatoes and rocket pesto still feature – and they’re joined by new creations, which include scallops and apple ceviche with lime (HK$198) and sea urchin chitarra (HK$288), featuring fresh square egg spaghetti. And loyalists will cheer to see the renowned giant macaroni lobster with brandy tomato sauce (HK$548) retained on this new menu. 

“We’re excited to open our doors and invite our friends in Kennedy Town to experience our unique brand of Fishsteria hospitality,” says chef Caprioli. “Our new menu features some of my most exciting creations yet, and I’m looking forward to seeing family and friends dive into our lovingly made food in our new waterside setting.” New Fortune House, 2-5A New Praya, Kennedy Town; ()

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A Bold Vintage


China’s historic roast-duck restaurant Quanjude opens in Bordeaux

A Bold Vintage


China’s historic roast-duck restaurant Quanjude opens in Bordeaux

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

A Bold Vintage

November 21, 2018 / by Zhang Yen

There are certain spots in major metropolises that become so iconic the very thing that once made them famous can become overly laurel-resting and highly touristic – think The Galle Face in Colombo, The Ritz in London and Les Deux Magots in Paris, to name just a few. But there’s a most interesting diversion in the case of the Quanjude restaurant in Beijing, a purveyor of the capital’s finest roast duck for more than 150 years, and which has served the likes of Fidel Castro and Richard Nixon from its multi-storey headquarters. This venerable institution now has branches all over the sprawling Chinese city, but chose to open its first European outlet on October 29 in, of all places, the French port city of Bordeaux. 

And Quanjude isn’t opening just anywhere in Bordeaux, but at the renowned 42–44 Allée de Tourny, the address that formerly housed the legendary restaurant Dubern, founded in 1894 and a long-time favourite of the Bordelais. Bordeaux chef Olivier Peyronnet will cook with chef Feng Xu from Quanjude in Beijing and another Franco-Chinese staff member in the new establishment. 

1分快三玩法It’s a sign of the times if ever there was one. So how do prices compare? Well, a whole duck in Quanjude in Beijing will set you back RMB 200, while its Bordeaux equivalent registers at €120 (approximately RMB 950). 

1分快三玩法Quanjude is owned by Beijing-based packaging millionaire James Yunjie Zhou, who also bought Château Renon in Tabanac on the Cadillac coast of Bordeaux four years ago – a milestone, as the 100th Bordeaux château acquired by the Chinese. (Zhou also owns the Sunshine Creek winery in Australia’s Yarra Valley). 

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At the time of the acquisition, Zhou, who also runs fencing and polo clubs in China, said he planned to use Renon as a base for his family in Bordeaux, and as a venue for entertaining people from the Chinese wine industry and the media. As such, visitors can stay at the château in the Pomerol Suite, or in a selection of rooms including the Saint Émilion, Cadillac, Saint Julien and Pessac Léognan. Renon was built in 1802 with 16th-century cellars, and includes stables. 

Zhou has big plans for Quanjude, too, with Bordeaux being the first of more to come. Currently there are plans to open Quanjude in Lyon and Paris, along with other European capitals. 

The menu comprises the best of the Chinese institution, slightly revisited through the filter of French gastronomy. Thus, à la carte starters include foie gras, hibiscus, quince and pear consommé for Gallic palates, along with Quanjude soup – a duck potage composed of fresh vegetables and noodles. And while there’s Peking duck for the main, there’s also an alternative Mallard served in a pie with salad and truffled sauce. Pescatarians aren’t neglected, either, so lobster tail, prawns, Mandarin fish (“served just like in Beijing”, according to the menu) and scallops all feature. There are set lunch and dinner menus, too, for those whose needs are more practical than stately. 

And given the owner’s penchant for French wine, there’s a large preference for Château Renon, which even has its own room at the restaurant. The estate’s red comes from hand-picked merlot (85%) and cabernet sauvignon (15%) grapes, is aged in new barrels and is characterised by a ruby colour, a complex nose that’s woody, roasted and fruity. It’s generally dense and warm, with good depth and length, and with the 2015 being the pick of the recent crop. There’s also a sweet white comprising semillon (85%) and sauvignon (15%) grape varieties. The sweet Cadillac is vinified and aged in new barrels. It bears a signature golden colour, with a woody nose redolent of candied fruits and honey, and goes down a storm with the Miso dessert, described as crème brulée – coffee cloud, caramelised pecan nuts and tonka ice cream. 

For those desireth of a last drop of global gentrification, there’s also the Quanjude Bordeaux Tea Salon, served on authentic Chinese porcelain. Given that Chinese investors have bought around 40% of all Bordeaux vineyards put up for sale in recent years and that by October’s end, an estimated 150 châteaux and wineries are now Chinese-owned in Bordeaux, Quanjude’s arrival is cultural new vintage. (quanjude-bordeaux.com)

Images: Facebook: @quanjudebdx

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