1分快三玩法

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Plumes of Smoke


Traditionally in silk or velvet, the smoking jacket is a leisurely after-dinner eveningwear piece for men

Plumes of Smoke


Traditionally in silk or velvet, the smoking jacket is a leisurely after-dinner eveningwear piece for men

Lifestyle > Fashion


Hugh Hefner and Crystal Hefner attend the Playboy Mansion's annual Halloween Bash on October 25, 2014 in Los Angeles

Hugh Hefner and Crystal Hefner attend the Playboy Mansion's annual Halloween Bash on October 25, 2014 in Los Angeles

Plumes of Smoke

June 20, 2018 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Image above: Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy in Woman of the Year (1942)

In the 17th century, when silk was widely traded along the Silk Road, the delicate material originating from China was adored by the European upper classes as a luxurious fabric for clothing. Men, in particular, wanted to be depicted in paintings wearing a silk robe-de-chambre or a long banyan gown as a symbol of their status and wealth.

Tobacco was popular, too; it was brought to Europe primarily from the Americas. Though its use was extensively regulated during the era, smoking was still considered a fashionable act for men. In England, George Latimer Apperson’s 1914 book The Social History of Smoking1分快三玩法 satirically lists “taking tobacco with a grace” as one of the accomplishments of “a complete, well-qualified gentleman”.

Enter the smoking jacket, designed to protect the proper gentleman’s attire from odours or stains. The dual notions of luxury and comfort made silk and velvet ideal for fabrics; other wool-blended fabrics such as cashmere, merino and plush were also commonly used. Donning this jacket after dinner, men would retreat to the garden or the smoking room with their pipe or a cigar in hand.   

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Justin Timberlake in Tom Ford at the 9th Annual Governors Awards

Justin Timberlake in Tom Ford at the 9th Annual Governors Awards

In 1926, British businessman Lou Rose designed men’s nightwear garments using fine fabrics, creating a more relaxed version of the smoking jacket; the brand is still active today and is now named for Derek Rose, Lou’s son. In the US, smoking jackets became a popular item for outerwear among celebrities, from Cary Grant and Frank Sinatra to Katharine Hepburn; the acclaimed actress wore a structured velvet smoking jacket with silk shawl lapels and an adorned belt in the 1942 film Woman of the Year. Other famous figures to wear the style included Playboy1分快三玩法 magazine creator Hugh Hefner – and Fred Astaire, the legendary Hollywood musical dancer and singer, was allegedly buried in his favourite smoking jacket. 

In 1966, Yves Saint Laurent created the famous tuxedo-style suit for women, Le Smoking, as part of his autumn/winter Pop Art collection. Aside from playing with traditional gender roles, it was also controversial at the time because of its sexual implications – relying not on exposure of bare skin, but a more subtle, smouldering look. The collar and shoulder line were adjusted to be more feminine, the curve was emphasised with a narrow waistline and the perfectly cut trousers helped give women’s legs an elongated appearance.   

Today, Le Smoking, or any piece resembling it, has become a staple in many women’s wardrobes, just like the little black dress. For men, the smoking jacket has stepped out of smoky rooms into a variety of occasions, from black-tie affairs to fashion soirees.

Images: Instagram: @tomford; Charley Gallay/Getty Images North America/AFP; Reg Lancaster/Stringer/Getty Images; George Rinhart/Corbis via Getty Images

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A model showcases a masculine look in a pinstripe trouser suit by Yves Saint Laurent. His Le Smoking suit became a signature piece for the designer

A model showcases a masculine look in a pinstripe trouser suit by Yves Saint Laurent. His Le Smoking suit became a signature piece for the designer

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Going Green


1分快三玩法Explore the colour of life, growth and renewal

Going Green


1分快三玩法Explore the colour of life, growth and renewal

Lifestyle > Fashion


Going Green

June 20, 2018 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

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Avant-Garde Approach


Miuccia Prada invites four architects to create items using black nylon fabric: the ultimate icon of the brand

Avant-Garde Approach


Miuccia Prada invites four architects to create items using black nylon fabric: the ultimate icon of the brand

Lifestyle > Fashion


Avant-Garde Approach

June 6, 2018 / by Sonia Altshuler

The language we encounter here is like an archaeological find, as fascinating to us as ancient scrolls or coins, because we sense that its time is running out

— Jacques Herzog
The reinterpreted frontal backpack by Rem Koolhaas for Prada Invites

The reinterpreted frontal backpack by Rem Koolhaas for Prada Invites

Italian designer Miuccia Prada has always been at the cutting edge of fashion’s drive. From countercultural fabric choices and subverting definitions of beauty to hiring architects to design her stores, as well as the brand’s foundations in Milan and Venice that show constantly revolving art exhibitions, Prada’s offerings have been ambitious and, in their finest manifestations, avant-garde. 

Now, the woman with the “ugly beauty” mantra has surprised the market again by inviting four celebrated creative minds to work on a unique item for her autumn/winter 2018 menswear collection. True to form, on this occasion Mrs Prada (as she’s called in-house) has switched the focus to the industrial side of the multifaceted Prada identity. Globally renowned architects Rem Koolhaas, Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec, Herzog & de Meuron and Konstantin Grcic have been enlisted to work with a simple brief: to create an item using the black nylon fabric, considered a Prada icon. 

In 1984, Mrs Prada first introduced black nylon with the brand’s backpack. It served as the perfect representation of the designer’s nomadic, exploratory sensibilities, but also of her understanding of the principle of utilitarianism. Totem of style and travel piece combined, the fashion-meets-function item became the It-bag overnight. It was minimal, too, emblazoned only with Prada’s iconic triangular logo. The black nylon backpack was a high-low stunt of prescient proportions, a game-changer that is still coveted today.

1分快三玩法Prada Invites – as the new initiative is called – brings together the architects to manifest four radically different approaches that investigate the poetic, practical, technical and aesthetic aspects of nylon. The Paris-based Bouroullec brothers have collaborated with a wide range of companies such as Cassina, Alessi, Samsung, Flos and more; their work covers a broad stretch from jewellery to structures, and from drawings to videos and photography. But this is their first time trying their hand at fashion design, so how did they find the project? 

1分快三玩法“I’ve always liked the profiles of people – architects, painters and students – walking around with their art folders,” says Ronan Bouroullec. “The movement of that rectangle… its clear-cut, fixed geometry contrasting with the moving bodies. This project takes that geometry and instils it in a shoulder bag, with its inside gusset, low-fastening elastic bands and eyelets, and use of a single colour, which produces a subtle graphical playfulness.”

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1分快三玩法The Munich-based Grcic has won numerous design awards and has curated exhibitions such as Design Real for London’s Serpentine Gallery, as well as building pavilions for the Venice and London Biennales. His style is pared down and minimal – “simplicity”, as he calls it – and for this project, he used maritime inspiration for his contribution. “The key reference for my proposal is the fishing vest, representing the idea of a bag, which is what the nylon material has been primarily used for, as a garment,” he explains. “My first thought was to recreate [German Fluxus artist] Joseph Beuys’ famous fishing vest in Prada black nylon. Later, I worked on two models that interpret the theme in a more abstract way: Apron and Hood.”

Sketch for the shoulder bag designed by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec

Sketch for the shoulder bag designed by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec

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Swiss phenoms Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron received the Pritzker Prize for architecture in 2001 and have assembled a veritable greatest-hits of work: Beijing’s National Stadium, aka the Bird’s Nest; the Tate Modern in London; the Pérez Art Museum Miami; and M+ in Hong Kong, due to open next year. Prada is a regular collaborator with Herzog & de Meuron, who build stores for the brand, but this was the inaugural fashion crossover. 

For the duo’s entry, Herzog has invoked language and its changing identity. “Language has lost its power – to persuade people with arguments or to enchant them with the poetry of words,” explains Herzog. “It was a weapon of enlightenment.” He argues that language has lost its seduction, becoming an empty vehicle of information. As such, he uses text as a design element, like a pattern or decoration, with entire passages almost like ornamental tattoos. “The language we encounter here is like an archaeological find, as fascinating to us as ancient scrolls or coins, because we sense that its time is running out,” he says. 

Herzog & de Meuron’s contributions to the project are called Language Restraint

Herzog & de Meuron’s contributions to the project are called Language Restraint

Konstantin Grcic’s design is inspired by Fluxus artist Joseph Beuys’ fishing vest

Konstantin Grcic’s design is inspired by Fluxus artist Joseph Beuys’ fishing vest

Last but not least is the towering figure of the Rotterdam-born Koolhaas, who runs Dutch architectural firm OMA. Currently a professor at Harvard, he has built the Fondazione Prada in Milan, the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow and the headquarters of China Central Television in Beijing, amongst others. 

Koolhaas has taken the same deconstructive approach to the Prada commission as he does on a building. “This project proposes a reinterpretation of the backpack, more suitable for the contemporary urban citizen,” he explains. “It is carried on the front so its contents are at any time accessible to the wearer. It is dimensioned to accommodate the devices that enable modern life to unfold, easily unpacked through convenient openings.” The smart countercultural thinking of back-to-front “gives a more intimate sense of ownership”, he adds. Which sounds a lot like Mrs Prada’s entire blueprint for design, doesn’t it?


Images: Courtesy of Prada

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Flower Power


A collection of artefacts from the illustrious Mexican artist Frida Kahlo
1分快三玩法 goes on display in London

Flower Power


A collection of artefacts from the illustrious Mexican artist Frida Kahlo
1分快三玩法 goes on display in London

Lifestyle > Fashion


Flower Power

June 6, 2018 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Image above: Frida Kahlo on a bench, 1939

Necklace of silver, enamel, turquoise and coral with hinged compartment, made by Matilde Poulat, Mexico City, c.1950, from the Museo Frida Kahlo

Necklace of silver, enamel, turquoise and coral with hinged compartment, made by Matilde Poulat, Mexico City, c.1950, from the Museo Frida Kahlo

Showing at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) this summer is the monumental exhibition Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up, which will present an extraordinary collection of personal artefacts and clothing belonging to the iconic Mexican artist. Locked away for 50 years after her death, this collection has never before been exhibited outside Mexico. As part of the legacy and endurance of Kahlo’s influence, activist and model Adwoa Aboah will also chair a discussion on her experience of female representation in media and the importance of women creating their own image; Aboah is known not only for her individual style that has graced innumerable magazine covers and catwalks, but also for her passionate support of women, which led her to create online platform Gurls Talk. The exhibition opens on June 16. (vam.ac.uk)

 
V&A exhibition book for  Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up

V&A exhibition book for Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up


Frida Style Express

Images: © Nickolas Muray Photo Archives (Frida Kahlo); Javier Hinojosa/© Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo Archives, Banco de México, Fiduciary of the Trust of the Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo Museums (necklace); © Victoria and Albert Museum, London 2018

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Poly Amour


Twenty-three students from Hong Kong’s fashion design programme at PolyU have created a unique sustainable collection for Swedish retail giant H&M

Poly Amour


Twenty-three students from Hong Kong’s fashion design programme at PolyU have created a unique sustainable collection for Swedish retail giant H&M

Lifestyle > Fashion


Poly Amour

May 23, 2018 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

 

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Sweden’s high-street retail giant H&M likes to push the envelope in terms of its sustainability, innovation and functionality. With its clout, the Stockholm-based company places itself at the cutting edge as it strives towards a toxic-free future for the fashion industry. H&M has made a pledge that by 2030, it will only use 100% recycled or other sustainably sourced materials in its clothing; currently, that figure stands at around 40%. 

Enter the brand’s tie-up with 23 students from Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU), who have designed a full collection for the fashion brand.“It all started with a simple idea of asking students to explore sustainable design,” says Hanna Hallin, sustainability manager of H&M Greater China. “The team took this concept to the skies and created innovative, edgy and authentic pieces, challenging the way fashion is made and enjoyed today.” 

H&M already has an annual line called the Conscious Exclusive collection, which utilises and creates sustainable fabrics, with the long-term goals of having zero garments going to the landfill and saving on natural resources. Customers can see where the clothes were made, what materials were used and who made them. 

1分快三玩法The PolyU designers’ collection is called Clothes We Live In, which translates into a collection of trans-seasonal, functional and modern pieces that are wearable 365 days a year. “Throughout the creative process, we have been very playful and innovative with our approaches to sustainability,” explains Basia Szkutnicka, a professor of practice and the director of the master’s programme in fashion and textile design at PolyU. And behind the 23 unique pieces of the collection are 23 students, who have focused on sustainable fashion by using deadstock fabric or unwanted garments. 

The capsule collection aims to break down conventional boundaries and doesn’t limit itself in terms of age, gender, season or occasion. Silhouettes are loose with a sportswear influence, while the style is edgy and contemporary. Among the standout pieces, the oversized unisex Jessica jacket is windproof due to the clever sealed-seam construction on the inside, which ensures there is no waste from the cutting in the fabric roll at the production stage. The quirky, almost surreal Luna coat is a transformable piece that becomes a soft duvet when fully opened – perfect for romantic adventurers in the mountains. The Shubhi three-piece, meanwhile, has numerous transformational possibilities and is somewhat Issey Miyake-esque in its multifunctional approach – from a top to trousers, or even from a skirt to a dress. 

Although the outfits are currently unavailable for sale, select pieces will be exhibited in the brand’s Causeway Bay store from June 5 to 11. The collaborative project marks the first time a group of students has designed such a bespoke collection anywhere for H&M – kudos to the designers for their future-forward fashion take.

Images: Master of Arts in Fashion & Textile Design at Hong Kong PolyU

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A Love Supreme


The spring accessories sale at Christie’s features price points for all

A Love Supreme


The spring accessories sale at Christie’s features price points for all

Lifestyle > Fashion


A Love Supreme

May 23, 2018 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

It’s not just art anymore. Increasingly, auction house Christie’s has been highlighting rare accessories. Fashionistas can swoon over a selection of coveted Hermès bags on May 30 at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre. Chief among them is the elegant matte-grey Himalaya Niloticus Crocodile Birkin 35, estimated at HK$600,000 to HK$800,000. 

Given the ever-growing appetite for men’s luxury products, Christie’s is also promoting a Louis Vuitton boxing set by Karl Lagerfeld, with a Louis Vuitton and Supreme backpack and jacket among the other goodies. 

“The demand for rare and fine handbags is surging in the Asia market,” explains Winsy Tsang, the Asia head of sales for handbags and accessories at Christie’s. “This season, we have more collectibles for men, while continuing to offer pieces that cater for day and night at every budget.”  Pieces start from HK$10,000. Get those paddles ready…

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Images: Provided to China Daily by Christie’s

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Corner the Market


1分快三玩法Chinese handbag brand Zesh delivers luxury manufacturing at reasonable prices

Corner the Market


1分快三玩法Chinese handbag brand Zesh delivers luxury manufacturing at reasonable prices

Lifestyle > Fashion


Corner the Market

May 23, 2018 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

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Established in 2014, the brand Zesh was founded in Shanghai by then-23-year-old Haoze Dong, a University of Southern California business school graduate and president of its Chinese Student Association. Specialising in contemporary, practical women’s handbags, Zesh’s prices range from RMB1,000 to RMB4,000.

1分快三玩法Dong grew up in a family business that manufactured luxury handbags, which gave him the rare privilege of understanding how premium bags are made. Aiming to showcase the high level of quality that “Made in China” products can achieve, he works with local factories that have manufactured high-end bags for more than 20 years, as well as leather suppliers that have served luxury brands. Zesh’s team, which consists of young designers who studied and worked in Europe as well as industry veterans, is heavily inspired by modern architecture.  

The signature collection is called Cubelet, with bags featuring three corners – the fourth corner is “cut off” and covered by triangular hardware in gold or silver, inspired by deconstructivism. In Chinese, “someone with edges and corners” refers to the type of person who is uncompromising and firmly stands by their beliefs. With such implications, the brand says it wishes to design for women who have edges and corners – meaning they’re independent, imperfect and don’t blindly follow trends. 

With a clear focus on the millennial market, Dong thinks that the younger Chinese generation is open-minded and eager to embrace new things. In five years, he wishes to build Zesh into one of the biggest China-based handbag brands and to ultimately change people’s stereotypes about the country’s fashion as “a Chinese fashion brand that truly has a global influence on the industry,” explains the young entrepreneur. 

When Dong was studying overseas, he realised that many of his friends would avoid buying “Made in China” products. Today, this ambitious young man intends to overcome that mentality and let Zesh’s quality speak for itself.

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Images: © Zesh 2014-2017/www.zeshlife.com

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New Vintage


From the Silk Road to the neo-Chinese cityscape, Shiatzy Chen channels your urban goddess

New Vintage


From the Silk Road to the neo-Chinese cityscape, Shiatzy Chen channels your urban goddess

Lifestyle > Fashion


New Vintage

May 23, 2018 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Combine some 21st-century neo-Chinese chic with early 20th-century Gabrielle Chanel, then overlay the influence of eclectic adventurers and travellers across the ancient Silk Road, and the structure for Shiatzy Chen’s autumn/winter 2018 collection takes glamorous form. 

1分快三玩法In a modern homage to the romantic spirit of this era, Wang Chen Tsai-Hsia, the brand’s founder and head designer, evokes the rich colours of Dunhuang and its majestic caves in the Chinese province of Gansu. 

A commercial trading centre between East and West containing 1,000-year-old examples of Buddhist art, this provenance suffuses the collection with a rich narrative of peony pink, pastel green, gingko yellow, indigo, beige, orange, bronze and ink black. 

The design palette embellishes intricate lines and abstract geometric patterns across short coats, bouffant skirts, sports jackets and Chinese-style robes, which evoke the heavenly beasts and flying goddesses adorning the walls of Dunhuang. Among the flamboyant fabrics are jacquard prints, colour-blocked wools, lace, organza and satin. 

The necessity for balance on the accessories side sees embroidered leather bucket bags with jade clasps and jade bracelet handles for the arms, and flats with straps and sneakers in black and white for the feet. Legendary and grounded, this contemporary silhouette’s one for the silky urban goddesses. 

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Images: Shiatzy Chen

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Check Mix


1分快三玩法Can’t decide on stripes, plaids or tartans? Pro tip: wear them all together

Check Mix


Can’t decide on stripes, plaids or tartans? Pro tip: wear them all together

Lifestyle > Fashion


Check Mix

April 6, 2018 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Checks are huge this year, but forget that old stereotype of them being conservative. Creativity is essential to a winning ensemble, with a wide mix of chequered patterns, lines, squares and various geometric prints seen on the runways from Paris to New York. Modernity is another key to the look. Perfect your style with some standout hues: anything floral, wild and unconventional.

Missoni

1分快三玩法Print mixology ◆ rainbow stripes ◆ light and breezy

 
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Hermès

1分快三玩法Geometric beauty ◆ modernistic palette ◆ madras-style squares

 
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Daks

Day to night ◆ the classic double-breasted coat ◆ British chic

 
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Sacai

Asymmetrical ◆ semi-sheer ◆ art of hybridity

 
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1分快三玩法Viktor & Rolf

Surrealism ◆ dimensional play ◆ hand-woven

 
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Images: Jean-François Jose (Hermès); Missoni; DAKS; Sacai; Viktor & Rolf

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Fashion Statement


From bold protest slogans to wearable tech, the humble T-shirt has gone through numerous incarnations, but one thing’s for certain: it’s never gone out of style

Fashion Statement


From bold protest slogans to wearable tech, the humble T-shirt has gone through numerous incarnations, but one thing’s for certain: it’s never gone out of style

Lifestyle > Fashion


 

Fashion Statement

April 6, 2018 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Images above: “I Wear What I Want”

T-shirt design by Beth Postle

T-shirt design by Beth Postle

Though it might seem to be the ultimate manifestation of 20th-century American mass consumerism or British punk protest culture, the T-shirt is much more than that. The ongoing London exhibition T-Shirt: Cult, Culture, Subversion at the Fashion and Textile Museum celebrates this historic, ubiquitous and universal garment. 

Decorated T-shaped tunics date back as far as the 5th century CE and screen-printing was documented during China’s Song Dynasty (960-1279 CE). In the modern era, the garment’s precursor was established in 1913 by the US Navy, whose regulation uniform kit included a lightweight short-sleeved white-cotton undervest. The first known literary usage came in 1920, when famed American writer F Scott Fitzgerald referenced the word “T-shirt” in his debut novel This Side of Paradise. That same year, the word was officially added to Webster’s Dictionary.

Today’s iconic screen-printed T-shirts came into full swing in the UK during the 1960s and ’70s – some prominent examples include the government’s “We Don’t Smoke” in 1969 and the Rolling Stones’ “Tongue and Lips” by John Pasche the following year. In 1971, punk pioneers Vivienne Westwood and Malcolm McLaren opened their legendary Let it Rock shop, which sold rock ’n’ roll memorabilia and slogan-adorned T-shirts. 

Vivienne Westwood protesting backstage

Vivienne Westwood protesting backstage

In 1977, Milton Glaser’s “I Love NY” design was unveiled as part of a new marketing campaign for the state of New York. Inspired by pop art, the iconic heart has become one of the most lucrative T-shirt designs of all time. 

As T-shirts transformed into identity platforms, the voice of political protest wasn’t far behind. Famed English fashion designer Katharine Hamnett met British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher at London Fashion Week in 1984; the former wore a shirt that read “85% Don’t Want Pershing” – a reference to public opposition to the relocation of US missiles. (Two decades later, in 2003, Hamnett sent models down the catwalk wearing shirts with the slogan: “Stop War, Blair Out” during the Iraq War.) 

By the year 2000, the rise of fast fashion meant that more than two billion T-shirts were being sold each year – that’s about one for every three people on the planet and that figure has since risen. The endless push for consumerism has driven many designers towards a goal of sustainability. 

Face No. 3 Jordan by Kitsch-22, 1977

Face No. 3 Jordan by Kitsch-22, 1977

Technology has started to play a role today – and the textile industry has seen lots of innovation. The first bulletproof T-shirt and another that could block up to 99% of UV rays arrived in 2010. Next, the world’s first programmable T-shirt – a collaboration between Ballantine’s and wearable tech company CuteCircuit – was born two years later, allowing its wearer to display status updates and more on an LCD screen. 

Then, the humble T-shirt seemed to go through the stratosphere. In 2013, for the centennial celebration of the garment’s provenance, French luxury purveyor Hermès released the most expensive T-shirt of all time, made entirely of crocodile skin and priced at US$91,500. A year later, “athleisure” overtook denim as the most popular shopping category and the release of Alexander Wang’s collection for H&M helped solidify the trend. Suddenly, T-shirts in lycra or neoprene, once reserved for the gym, became perfect for just about every other activity. 

Two years ago, Vetements released its now-notorious DHL T-shirt, noted as much for its “real-life meme” as for its US$300 price tag (an original purchased directly from DHL costs about US$7). In an Inception1分快三玩法-esque move, this was followed by the launch of Vetememes, a parody brand drawing on the social media-fuelled success of the brand that left everyone wondering if the T-shirt had finally jumped the shark. 

But perhaps we’re moving into a simpler era where do-it-yourself T-shirts will take the lead. When everyone’s goal is to go viral, you don’t necessarily need a designer brand or a giant budget to create a style seen by millions. Last summer, during his performance at the Panorama Music Festival in New York City, singer Frank Ocean donned a shirt that read “Why be racist, sexist, homophobic or transphobic when you could just be quiet?” Social media went ballistic – as did the business of 18-year-old Kayla Robison, who makes the T-shirt for her brand Green Box Shop, where it retails for just US$20. 

Maybe it’s back to basics – but whatever happens, this 5th-century icon looks as contemporary as ever. 

T-Shirt: Cult, Culture, Subversion is at London’s Fashion and Textile Museum until May 6. (ftmlondon.org) 

Images: Courtesy of Beth Postle; Graham Pearson (My Booze Hell); Marta Lamovsek (Vivienne Westwood Tshirt and Vivienne backstage protesting); Boneshaker Photography (The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist); photo: Susan A Barnett, published in T: A Typology of T-Shirts © 2014. All Rights Reserved (All Over Trump, Girl with Pearl Earring, I Wear What I Want); courtesy of Fashion and Textile Museum (Don’t Be a Waster, Single-Use Plastic is Never Fantastic); photo: Sheila Rock, courtesy of Paul Stolper Gallery (Face No.3 Jordan, 1977. Kitsch22); photo: Derek Hutchins, © Dove/White, courtesy of Paul Stolper Gallery (Exploding Mickey); Fashion and Textile Museum

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