1分快三玩法

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Time Check


1分快三玩法With perfect pre-CNY credentials, DFS Group presents more than 120 iconic and rare chronographs in Macau

Time Check


1分快三玩法With perfect pre-CNY credentials, DFS Group presents more than 120 iconic and rare chronographs in Macau

Lifestyle > Fashion


 

Time Check

January 8, 2020 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

If you haven’t yet had the chance to head to Macau for the 11th edition of the Masters of Time exhibition at T Galleria by DFS (in collaboration with Shoppes at Four Seasons), worry not. There’s still time – it remains on until February – to appreciate the specially created collection that covers six time periods: the 19th century, the 1920s, the 1960s, the 2000s, “today” and “tomorrow”. 

1分快三玩法Such chronological breadth reveals much in the way of technical mastery. The heights of craftsmanship feature in more than 120 exceptional and rare watches, along with fine-jewellery masterpieces from 25 prestigious brands (including Blancpain, Bulgari, Cartier, Franck Muller, Hublot, Jaquet Droz and Zenith), as well as compilations of exclusive, limited-edition and world-debut pieces. 

“This year marks another pinnacle of DFS’s collaborative efforts with the world’s leading brands in haute horlogerie,” says Matthew Green, DFS Group’s senior vice-president of watches and jewellery, noting that the offerings appeal to consumers of all ages and aspirations. “We are proud to showcase this peerless portfolio of timepieces and jewellery that promises to delight seasoned collectors and first-time buyers alike.” 

1分快三玩法While the historical influences are profound, DFS concludes that “we are living in one of the golden ages of watchmaking, with well-established brands standing alongside new independents, offering an extensive array of models that provide something for virtually every taste”. 

Take the example of case materials, which range from traditional steel and gold to titanium and ceramic, and now to such exotic substances as Panerai’s Carbotech and IWC’s Ceratanium. There is also increased use of open-working by the likes of Girard Perregaux and Hublot, in addition to compilations now being combined more frequently, such as the Bulgari Octo Finissimo Chronograph GMT Automatic. There’s even a timepiece – the Panerai Luminor Tourbillon GMT – that contains 3D-printed material.

For timelords of the future, get ahead with the new Zenith Defy Inventor. Heralding its new disruptive Zenith Oscillator control system – which replaces the traditional sprung balance, used for more than three centuries – the oscillator dispenses with the 30 or so components traditionally used in a regulating watch, and features a case made of lightweight titanium and Zenith’s aluminium polymer composite Aeronith. 

The immediate future of watchmaking continues – undefied.

Images provided to China Daily

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Revisiting a Classic


1分快三玩法Pantone’s choice of Classic Blue as its 2020 Color of the Year is a calming vision of hope and optimism for the new decade

Revisiting a Classic


Pantone’s choice of Classic Blue as its 2020 Color of the Year is a calming vision of hope and optimism for the new decade

Lifestyle > Fashion


 

Revisiting a Classic

January 8, 2020 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

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The colour blue is everywhere around us: in the sky we look up to each morning and in the seas we travel across. It’s also the current buzzword of the beauty, wellness automotive and tech industries. Fitting, then, that to start the new decade, US trend-forecasting company Pantone has revealead its 2020 Color of the Year: Classic Blue, a hue it has described as being a “universal favourite”. (The 2019 selection was the “life-affirming” Living Coral, which was said to highlight the need for real-world experiences versus social media.) Pantone noted Classic Blue’s ability to instil calm and confidence, and its way of offering a dependable and stable foundation on which to build “as we cross the threshold into a new era”. 

“We are living in a time that requires trust and faith. It is this kind of constancy and confidence that is expressed by Pantone 19-4052 [Classic Blue],” remarks Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute. “A boundless blue, evocative of the vast and infinite evening sky, Classic Blue encourages us to look beyond the obvious to expand our thinking – challenging us to think more deeply, increase our perspective and open the flow of our communication.”

Interestingly, blue is also not a colour associated with its traditional traits of sadness, despite centuries of artistic and literary minds using the hue to represent melancholy, including jazz music (such as Miles Davis’s Kind of Blue1分快三玩法) and the genre of blues itself. “People don’t associate blue with sadness anymore,” says Eiseman. “I think that’s kind of an older-generation reaction.”

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1分快三玩法For 20 years, Pantone’s Color of the Year has influenced product development and purchasing decisions in numerous industries, including fashion, home furnishings, and industrial design, as well as product packaging and graphic design. Interestingly, its first-ever colour pick in 2000 was for Cerulean Blue. 

Pantone Color Institute analysts scour the globe looking for new colour influences from the worlds of entertainment, film, art and fashion, as well as popular travel destinations, design, new lifestyles and socio-economic conditions. Influences may also stem from new technologies, materials, textures and effects that impact colour, relevant social media platforms and even upcoming sporting events that capture worldwide attention. 

Classic Blue already maintains a strong, loyal following. The British Royal Family has always worn it; the Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton and the Duchess of Sussex Meghan Markle both wore Classic Blue at separate engagements on November 7, 2019. Markle regularly wears Classic Blue dresses from Jason Wu and Roksanda Athena. Princess Diana wore the hue on numerous occasions, too. Kim Kardashian West has been recently spotted in the colour, while Lauren Hutton wore Armani in Classic Blue to the 2019 British Fashion Awards on December 2. 

Classic Blue has also been the colour du jour of the wellness world. Many food scientists have been encouraging people to eat blueberries and blue-tinted foods that contain beneficial anthocyanins. And luxury skincare products such as Chanel’s latest offering, Blue Serum, have adopted the word in their nomenclature. The automotive and digital industries have long used the colour and continue to develop more products in the shade. Ferraris, Lamborghinis, Jaguars and more have all appropriated this colour.

Above all, in today’s ultra-fast-paced technological blur of a world, blue is viewed as a colour of anti-anxiety, hope and optimism. “It has depth to it, but it’s a color of anticipation because we’re looking ahead,” says Eiseman. “What’s going to come?” May your visions for 2020 be tinged with Classic Blue.


Images: © 2017 Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A.; Instagram: @kensingtonroyal; Instagram: @sussexroyal;

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Chill Vibes


Everyone’s invited to the joyous world of Gypsy Sport for spring/summer 2020

Chill Vibes


Everyone’s invited to the joyous world of Gypsy Sport for spring/summer 2020

Lifestyle > Fashion


 

Chill Vibes

November 27, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

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1分快三玩法Designer Rio Uribe decked the catwalk (in fact, a New York rooftop) with palm trees, fruit cocktails and sparkling gold body paint as part of his celebratory, feel-good SS20 collection – so good it almost felt like vacation fashion, an eternal sunshine of tangerine and canary yellow materials and minds.

Uribe’s clothes are unabashedly one-of-a-kind and his spring ready-to-wear 2020 collection hit the right spot from its first look: a halter-neck dress fashioned from hundreds of beaded safety pins, almost like chain mail, to the tropicana jeans adorned with appliqué hibiscus flowers, and to the safety pin-studded Bermuda shorts. Previously the brand has shown tattoo tops, artisanal denim “Chanel” jackets, denim-banded pencil skirts and its elevated Mad Planet sneakers.

Gypsy Sport is proud of its US heritage and all products are made in America – specifically in New York City, Philadelphia and Los Angeles – and online orders are shipped from the brand’s so-called “fulfilment centre” in LA. So far in Asia, the brand is only stocked in Japan and South Korea, but not yet in China or Hong Kong. Expect that to change soon.

Intriguingly, Gypsy Sport is so laid back and cool, the six-year-old brand even invites visitors to its website to partake in castings or collaborate with the brand in another way. “Shoot an email to casting@gypsysportny.com”, it reads. In June, Gypsy Sport held an open call at the Bruce Gallery in LA’s Chinatown, which was answered by more than 300 people. In the new fashion universe of sustainability and rebooted notions of luxury, Uribe is putting out the coolest vibe on the block.

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The Margiela Myth


Elusive fashion designer Martin Margiela takes the floor and guides us through his career in a new must-see documentary film. Just don’t expect to see his face

The Margiela Myth


Elusive fashion designer Martin Margiela takes the floor and guides us through his career in a new must-see documentary film. Just don’t expect to see his face

Lifestyle > Fashion


 

The Margiela Myth

November 27, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

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Belgian designer Martin Margiela has been called the fashion world’s answer to British street artist Banksy, so elusive is his physical presence. The designer’s revolutionary creations have forever changed the face of fashion, yet he has remained almost anonymous. From the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp to becoming Jean-Paul Gaultier’s assistant, and from creative director at Hermès to leading his own brand, Margiela has never shown his face publicly – for more than 20 years and across 41 provocative collections. This sort of thing is almost unthinkable in the digital age of social media and Instagram. 

Thus, the premiere of Reiner Holzemer’s documentary film Martin Margiela in His Own Words1分快三玩法 last week in New York had the fashion cognoscenti delirious at the thought they might see 62-year-old Margiela on screen and even speaking. Alas, not. He appears, but only by way of his hands. However, for the first time, the “Banksy of fashion” reveals his drawings, notes and personal items, giving us an exclusive peek at his vision and career, via his hands and voice. 

Margiela tells us what led him to create his own company, Maison Martin Margiela, with Jenny Meirens as his business partner – and why he quit the fashion world entirely, in silence and without public announcement. He does it all with an incredibly unexpected humility, coming from a man of such fame (and notoriety). 

Says director Holzemer – who also directed and produced Dries, documenting fashion designer Dries Van Noten – of this film and of his subject: “This is much more than a simple success story. To me, it first of all is the story of a man who followed his own way and who, by his attitude, became ‘immortal’. And a man who had the courage to quit at the top of his career and turn his back on the draining fashion world in order to be happy.” Margiela’s myth lives on, stronger than ever.

Images provided to China Daily

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Mr Tiffany


The famed jeweller launches a new universe of men’s products

Mr Tiffany


1分快三玩法The famed jeweller launches a new universe of men’s products

Lifestyle > Fashion


 

Mr Tiffany

November 13, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Forever associated with the image of Audrey Hepburn’s insouciant chic in the film Breakfast at Tiffany’s1分快三玩法, the iconic New York-based jeweller Tiffany & Co is now giving men the chance to get in on the act. Starting this month, Tiffany Men’s has been created in the spirit of the modern man: bold and confident, casual yet refined, a style arbiter with a discerning eye for quality. Its first collections, Tiffany 1837 Makers and Diamond Point, will feature jewellery, home objects and accessories, watches and more. “Tiffany Men’s is centred on craftsmanship as the foundation of our company,” says Reed Krakoff, the brand’s chief artistic officer. “Tiffany 1837 Makers is a nod to the workmanship and time-honoured techniques used in creating jewellery – the idea that there’s a person behind each object.” 

One of the most impressive items in the collection is the one-of-a-kind, handcrafted solid sterling silver and 18K yellow gold vermeil chess set – price available upon request. But the range of designs in Tiffany Men’s also incorporates barware and even trophies, acknowledging the jeweller’s 160-year history of making sports trophies for historic tennis and sailing tournaments. So gents, accessories at the ready – now it’s breakfast, lunch and dinner at Tiffany’s.

Images: © T&CO. 2019/ Roe Etheridge

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Fashion Sense


Unless the apparel industry changes its ways (and shoppers their habits), we’re all going down the landfill – fast

Fashion Sense


Unless the apparel industry changes its ways (and shoppers their habits), we’re all going down the landfill – fast

Lifestyle > Fashion


 

Fashion Sense

October 30, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Stella McCartney’s “regenerated cashmere” campaign for winter 2017

Stella McCartney’s “regenerated cashmere” campaign for winter 2017

“Vain trifles as they seem, clothes… change our view of the world and the world’s view of us,” wrote Virginia Woolf in her 1928 book Orlando. Clothes remain our most basic visual communication tool, conveying our social and economic status, our ambition, our occupation and our self-worth.

1分快三玩法If the 20th and 21st centuries feel increasingly like a Gatsbian journey into abundance and excess, nowhere is that humungous hubris more apparent than in the world’s fashion industry. Shoppers buy five times more clothing now than they did in 1980. In 2018, that averaged 68 garments per year, just over one per week. As a whole, global citizens acquire 80 billion apparel items annually. 

1分快三玩法And if the global population swells to 8.5 billion by 2030, as is predicted, and if GDP per capita rises by 2% in developed nations and 4% in developing economies, economists estimate we will buy 63% more fashion – a rise from 62 million tons at present to 102 million tons. Boston Consulting Group claims that staggering amount is “equivalent to 500 billion T-shirts”. 

1分快三玩法Of course, technology and its interaction with millennials and Generation Z was meant to represent the narrative to a more precise, less indulgent and wasteful world, but the “free return” policy of digitally purchased clothing that doesn’t fit on Net-a-Anything-and-Everything platforms has only poured fuel on the already rampant flames. 

The fashion industry devours a quarter of chemicals produced worldwide; the creation of just one T-shirt requires one-third of a pound of lab-concocted fertilisers and 25.3 kilowatts of electricity, and the World Wildlife Fund estimates it takes up to 2,700 litres of water to grow the cotton. Synthetic fabrics release microfibres into water when washed, both at mills and at home. As much as 40% enters rivers, lakes and oceans, where it is ingested by fish and molluscs – and in turn, by us. In 2017, Greenpeace even discovered microfibres in the waters of Antarctica. 

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And if the pollution’s not enough, consider the waste. In the UK, 9,513 garments are dumped every five minutes; it’s the country’s fastest-growing waste stream. This clothing contains synthetics that aren’t biodegradable. Over the last 20 years, Americans have doubled the amount of clothes they throw away, from seven million to 14 million tons; that’s 80 pounds per person per year. The European Union disposes of 5.8 million tons of apparel and textiles each year. Worldwide, we toss 2.1 billion tons of fashion per annum. 

Here’s the biggest irony of all; in dressing ourselves and flattering our incessant vanity, we have stripped the planet bare and polluted its every artery, vein and capillary. We have, in short, dressed for our collective apocalypse. 

That’s largely the fault of fast fashion, writes Dana Thomas in her latest title, Fashionopolis: The Price of Fast Fashion and the Future of Clothes, which she’s promoting at the Hong Kong Literary Festival (from November 1 to 10). It’s a follow-up to her previous bestseller, Deluxe: How Luxury Lost its Luster.1分快三玩法 Complicit in the rush of fast fashion’s grip has been ourselves – as unquestioning consumers. 

Fashionopolis: The Price of Fast Fashion and the Future of Clothes  Published by Penguin Press (  penguinrandomhouse.com  )

Fashionopolis: The Price of Fast Fashion and the Future of Clothes
Published by Penguin Press
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Writes Thomas in her introduction: “As I sit here and write this, I’m wearing a black cotton jersey dress with a white pointed collar and shirt cuffs, made in Bangladesh. I spotted it on a Facebook ad, clicked through, and within days it was delivered to my home. It is flattering and fashionably on point. But did I think hard about where it came from when I ordered it? Did I consider why it only set me back 30 bucks? Did I need this dress? No. No. And nope. I am not alone.”

What we should wear is one of the fundamental questions we ask ourselves every day. More than ever, we’re told it should be something new. Today, the clothing industry employs every sixth person on Earth, making it the most labour-intensive industry – more than agriculture or defence. Yet fewer than 2% of those workers earn a living wage. (Among the many sweatshop scandals over the years, in 2016, H&M, Next and Esprit were found to have Syrian refugee children sewing and hauling bundles of clothes at subcontracted workshops in Turkey.) 

Historically, the apparel trade has exploited labour, the environment and intellectual property – and in the last three decades, with the simultaneous unfurling of fast fashion, globalisation and the tech revolution, those abuses have multiplied exponentially, primarily out of view. We are in dire need of an entirely new human-scale model. 

1分快三玩法But it’s not all gloom and doom, and Fashiongeddon isn’t upon us just yet. Thomas introduces the visionaries who are propelling the industry toward a more positive future by reclaiming traditional craft and launching cutting-edge sustainable technologies to produce better fashion. As a result, she sees a renewal in multiple developments, including 3D-printed clothes, clean denim processing, hyperlocalism in rural areas such as the American South, a return to manufacturing in New York and across Europe, and scientific breakthroughs to enable better fabric recycling and new lab-grown materials (“bio-couture”). She meets the A to Z of the ecosystem, from small-town makers and Silicon Valley whizzes to household names such as Stella McCartney, Levi’s and Rent the Runway. 

Thomas concludes that while we’ve all been casual about our clothes, it’s time to get dressed with intention – and that the Fashionopolis of the future could not only be a good thing, but a just one as well.

Images provided to China Daily

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It’s Just Fashion, Old Sport


Thom Browne clashes athletics and 18th-century severity as he takes his fantastical, theatrical vision to new heights for men’s SS20

It’s Just Fashion, Old Sport


1分快三玩法Thom Browne clashes athletics and 18th-century severity as he takes his fantastical, theatrical vision to new heights for men’s SS20

Lifestyle > Fashion


 

It’s Just Fashion, Old Sport

October 3, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Thom Browne has taken his fantastical, theatrical visions of male dress to new heights with his SS20 runway collection and there are so many varied influences that it’s difficult to note them all; think Marie Antoinette meets the US’s National Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB) and National Basketball Association (NBA). (Browne actually dresses the FC Barcelona football team.) Oh, and dancing, too: the American Ballet Theatre. In his show notes, the designer says he imagines himself as a host at “my Versailles country club”, but to us it felt more like the fête champêtre of Alain-Fournier’s Le Grand Meaulnes.

1分快三玩法In this fashion fusion of 18th-century severity, sports and ballet, sent down the runway are Bermuda shorts with built-in jockstraps, high-cut seersucker tutus, seersucker shorts, football padding, corset-lacing, pointy-toe correspondent shoes, wildly mismatched sports socks, barely-there skirts (which sat like a rumour above matching codpieces), and even drop-waisted skirts and bouncing cage skirts. Jackets are oversize and quilted, though some with shorter arms, in a style not unlike Browne’s iconic above-the-ankle trousers. The designer even goes marine at one juncture, showing capes and coats embellished with seahorses, whales and starfish. And for sheer exuberance, the mile-wide pannier and turned-up trousers feel more like spoofy cosplay than couture – what if men had dressed like women in the 18th century, he seems to be positing.

Browne rides the sports analogy across the gamey gamut of accessories, too, with bustles shaped like American footballs, round bags like soccer balls, and balls and bags galore. There are lattice-worked NFL-shaped helmets, headbands and seersucker panniers worn on the shoulder, redolent of American football’s protective wear. “I’ve always used sports as a reference,” explains Browne. “And playing with the severity of the 18th-century reference, grounding it in sports, was a way to bring it into the men’s world.” Part home run, part estate run wild, this is one magical, adventurous costume party.

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Images: 2019 THOM BROWNE, INC

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Game On


1分快三玩法Luxury brands are increasingly turning to an unlikely source to engage consumers: gaming

Game On


Luxury brands are increasingly turning to an unlikely source to engage consumers: gaming

Lifestyle > Fashion


 

Game On

October 3, 2019 / by Stéphane Roth

Image above: YSL pop-up at Coachella 2019

Endless Runner by Louis Vuitton

1分快三玩法Endless Runner by Louis Vuitton

1分快三玩法If shopping is today’s top leisure activity for people all over the world, then the insufferable portmanteau “retailtainment” is its most advanced stage. Basically, this refers to the enduring trend where retail meets entertainment in creating a unique experience for clients. To connect with their consumers, brands have long understood the need to create emotional connections and to constantly surprise and delight. 

Luxury brands have understood that paradigm better than any other players in the retail game. They created flagship stores in the 2000s to showcase their brands’ universes. Then came branded cafes and restaurants within the stores, so as to literally “eat the brand” – including the enduring success of the Armani cafes in Hong Kong and Paris, the Beige Alain Ducasse restaurant in Chanel’s Ginza store in Tokyo, and the brand-new Tadao Ando-designed Tiffany at Cat Street store in Tokyo’s trendy Harajuku, featuring a playful cat-themed cafe. 

To take things one step further towards creating immersive experiences, some luxury brands started creating hotels. Among the recent examples are the Bulgari Hotel Shanghai, which opened in 2018 to echo the luxurious Roman style of the Italian jeweller after launching similar venues in Milan and London, and the new Fauchon l’Hôtel Paris on Place de la Madeleine, which celebrates both pâtisserie and hospitality in the Instagram-worthy pink and black rooms.

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1分快三玩法And we can’t forget pop-ups with unique products or services (remember the Hermès Instamatic concept, where it would dye your old silk scarves on-site and give them a new style?), immediate desirability for a short period of time in a high-traffic venue (Dior’s fragrance pop-up on the trendy Greek island of Mykonos this summer) or the creation of social-media buzz (the YSL Beauté pop-up that looked like a gas station at the 2019 edition of the Coachella festival). 

So what’s the next trend? Brands now want to “play with your mind” and capitalise on our universal appetite for games. We all enjoy a little fun – and if we can find these luxury houses cool and playful, it’s all the better for the brand. Clearly targeting millennials and tapping into their nostalgia for the 1980s, Louis Vuitton released a video game called Endless Runner in July. With its basic 16-bit graphics, bold colours and simple rules, the game echoes Virgil Abloh’s latest autumn/winter 2019 men’s collection. 

Just days before, Gucci introduced Gucci Arcade on its mobile app with two 8-bit video games: Gucci Bee and Gucci Ace. Designed in a clear ’80s approach, these games play with some of the brand’s codes (such as the bees) or its key products like sneakers, thus evoking the playful universe that artistic director Alessandro Michele has been promoting over the past seasons.

In the unending quest to build loyalty, engaging with consumers is key. Smart brands know that true luxury is an experience – whether that’s at a boutique, at home or at your fingertips.

Tiffany’s Harajuku store

Tiffany’s Harajuku store

Gucci Arcade

Gucci Arcade

Images: © Gucci (Gucci Arcade); © YSL Beauty (YSL pop-up at Coachella 2019); © Stéphane Roth (Tiffany’s Harajuku store); © Louis Vuitton (Endless Runner by Louis Vuitton)

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Cosmic Chic


Antwerp’s Walter Van Beirendonck takes his SS20 collection in an otherworldly direction

Cosmic Chic


Antwerp’s Walter Van Beirendonck takes his SS20 collection in an otherworldly direction

Lifestyle > Fashion


 

Cosmic Chic

September 18, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

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Walter Van Beirendonck is both a maverick and dreamer in the Antwerp fashion universe, at times otherworldly and always countercultural over the course of his career, which spans nearly four decades. Known for his bold, colourful designs, he takes inspiration from a diverse range of sources, including technology, ethnography, art and pop culture, and consistently ticks the boxes on ecology, mass consumerism, gender and sexuality. 

For spring/summer 2020, the eccentric designer channels kinky, luxe sportswear through something he calls “Witblitz Alien Vintage” – a collection designed for his fantasy iteration of extraterrestrials, should they arrive on earth or at the International Space Station anytime soon. “I pictured being introduced to a small part of the alien folk – a community with a limitless diversity of forms and looks,” the designer explains. ET-à-porter, indeed. And it incorporates an earthly vernacular. “I put South African words on the designs because of their off-centre sounds,” he adds. 

The overall look is distinguished by lantern sleeves, men’s leggings, masks, Japanese kimonos, Western suit blazers and layering – among the standout pieces is an O-shaped plastic sheeting jacket that’s worn like a swim ring. Although emblazoned with echoes of manga meets Yayoi Kusama meets vaudeville meets street luxe graffiti, it feels unlike most other collections from last century, this century and this season. “I want to create what is 100% of the now,” he says. Out of this world, baby.

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Images: Walter Van Beirendonck; photography: Dan Lecca (SS20 runway images); photography: Ronald Stoops (SS20 backstage images)

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Play Time


1分快三玩法Japan’s National Museum of Modern Art in Kyoto, in collaboration with the Kyoto Costume Institute, examines contemporary dress codes – and the fashion guises and games we assume and adopt

Play Time


Japan’s National Museum of Modern Art in Kyoto, in collaboration with the Kyoto Costume Institute, examines contemporary dress codes – and the fashion guises and games we assume and adopt

Lifestyle > Fashion


 

Play Time

September 4, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Image above: The exhibition’s poster

Comme des Garçons/Rei Kawakubo design for spring/summer 2018

1分快三玩法Comme des Garçons/Rei Kawakubo design for spring/summer 2018

Fashion has always been in a state of constant flux. Even in 12th-century China, a monarch was said to have enjoyed women wearing dangling pearls and jade in a “hair-knot that sways at every step”, while the emperor who built the Great Wall preferred a “hair-knot that rises above the clouds”. Women of the Tang dynasty wore the “hair-knot of the homing bird”, and a writer in the last years of the Qing dynasty described the “hair-knot of disintegration and homeless wandering” as a style of the day. “The times are indeed out of joint,” he wrote. “I tremble to think what is to come.” 

What came was modernity. In 1993, Estelle Ellis, Seventeen magazine’s founding promotion director, gave a speech at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, in which she explained: “Fashion is a perpetual-motion machine expressed in four areas: ‘mode’ – the way we dress; ‘manners’ – the way we express ourselves; ‘mores’ – the way we live; and ‘markets’ – the way we are defined demographically and psychologically.”

Every culture, society and group has its own fashion codes, and this has given rise to a form of communication that resembles a game. In today’s breakneck digital world of social networking, anyone can transmit images of their attire, ushering in a new phase in the way we engage with fashion. 

Until October 14, Japan’s National Museum of Modern Art in Kyoto and the Kyoto Costume Institute are staging Dress Code: Are You Playing Fashion? The exhibition focuses on contemporary fashion, encouraging viewers to re-examine dress codes in contemporary society and our apparel practices – or games. 

Rather than being a historical narrative or an unravelling of a particular designer’s work, Dress Code is laid out under a series of themes, all of which spur questions of fashion’s intricate codes. For example, is it a violation of the code to walk around outside naked? Is it necessary to be artistically and culturally literate? Should you be aware of how others look at you? Is it wrong to listen to what adults say? Can everyone be fashionable? And do all of the above criteria make fashion an endless game? 

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Yuima Nakazato design for autumn/winter 2016

Yuima Nakazato design for autumn/winter 2016

1分快三玩法The title of the exhibition hits the spot in terms of topicality. Among many examples, China’s fixation with gamification and its relation to the world of fashion and cosmetics has seen luxury brands attempt to make their offerings more playful via arcade-style promotions, claw-grabbing machines and digital live-streaming events. And as it is in competitive sports, the players and spectators can be interchangeable. 

Wearing clothes are an act of becoming someone. Dress Code explores the diverse practices of contemporary artists and their relationship to the meaning of fashion. In his most recent work, Dutch photographer Hans Eijkelboom has been taking photos of passers-by on streets all over the world for more than 15 years. Several people in the same place on the same day are often wearing similar outfits – a reminder that style is an expression of individuality but is seldom unique. Renowned American photographer Cindy Sherman has worked exclusively in self-portraits since the 1970s; her Society Portraits series from 2008 acts out stereotypes popularised in popular media, and embodies her critique of superficial values such as anti-ageing and social status. Yasumasa Morimura, a Japanese appropriation artist who re-enacts historical portraits and photos, bends roles and gender in Self-Portrait as Marilyn in Tokyo University, Komaba Campus1分快三玩法, where he assumes Marilyn Monroe’s identity while striking the famous pose in which she holds down her skirt while the wind blows from below – as a bunch of bored-looking university students sit unmoved in a lecture hall.

To explore the relationship between characters and clothing in theatre, film and manga, the Kyoto Costume Institute commissioned artists to create work based on the exhibition concept. These include Shinichi Sakamoto, the author of the manga series Innocent and Innocent Rouge, as well as the theatre companies Mum & Gypsy and Chelfitsch. The latter two make use of the Costume Institute’s vast collection, highlighting the process of choosing clothing to match the personalities of each character in a theatrical work – and the resulting creation mirrors the everyday action of picking out clothes when we get up in the morning. 

It all serves as a reminder that we unconsciously participate in the game of fashion. And it’s not just how we wear items, but the process, from those “hair-knots swaying at every step” to what sneakers we’ll choose to put on the domestic robots and accessorial androids-du-jour of the future. Are you ready to play?

Images: ©The Kyoto Costume Institute, photo by Takashi Hatakeyama (Comme des Garçons/Rei Kawakubo design for spring/summer 2018; Jeff Koons x Louis Vuitton backpack, 2017; Gucci/Alessandro Michele design for autumn/winter 2018; Beautiful People/Hidenori Kumakiri design for autumn/winter 2017; Yuima Nakazato design for autumn/winter 2016; Koché/Christelle Kocher design for spring/summer 2018); ©The Kyoto Costume Institute, photo by Masayuki Hayashi (Hi Brows boots, late 1960s); provided to China Daily

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The Ultraglamorous Life


1分快三玩法New York label Area delivers megawatt playfulness for autumn/winter 2019

The Ultraglamorous Life


New York label Area delivers megawatt playfulness for autumn/winter 2019

Lifestyle > Fashion


 

The Ultraglamorous Life

September 4, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Named after one of New York’s most popular Manhattan nightclubs of the 1980s, Area is a womenswear and accessories design studio specialising in textile development, innovative embellishments and quality craftsmanship. Founded in 2014 by Parsons School of Design alumni Beckett Fogg and Piotrek Panszczyk (of Calvin Klein Collection and Chloé, respectively), it has been on a meteoric rise to stardom since. 

Area’s signature style is multifaceted: witty, decadent and suffused with pop energy. Worn by Hollywood celebrities and luminaries from Ariana Grande to Michelle Obama, the brand’s fluid satin dresses and fit-and-flare silhouettes showcase ultra-feminine glamour. 

For autumn/winter 2019, Area has raised the stakes – and the ambition – with a veritable solar system of style and iconography via searingly stylish bags and shoes, and a look-at-me-now Instagram playfulness in its purple-to-pink fur, crystal-embossed cable knits, fluoro-orange jumpsuits, fringe trousers and silver plastic belts with the words “Soon Apocalypse” dangling from them. For those inclined towards some megawatt hyper-pop power-dressing, Area sells locally through I.T, On Pedder and Style One in Hong Kong, at Hirmoso and SKP in China, and at Rare Market in Seoul.

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Images: Courtesy of Area

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