1分快三玩法

d9c8b52f-1878-4819-8778-d064d087b986_rw_1920.jpg
CBDZHKSHOW2019_V19.jpg
heading.jpg
head.jpg
head.jpg
head.jpg
The vibrant setting for Get Up, Stand Up Now.jpg
head.jpg
20736365544d17b7-1.php.jpg

Art


SCROLL DOWN

Art


d9c8b52f-1878-4819-8778-d064d087b986_rw_1920.jpg

All’s Fair in Art


Acclaimed visual extravaganza Art Central returns to Hong Kong for its sixth edition in March

All’s Fair in Art


1分快三玩法Acclaimed visual extravaganza Art Central returns to Hong Kong for its sixth edition in March

Culture > Art


 

All’s Fair in Art

January 8, 2020 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

1分快三玩法In the blink of an eye, Art Central has evolved – from playing the David to Art Basel’s Goliath to becoming a dynamic cornerstone of Hong Kong Art Week. Timed to coincide with Art Basel’s Hong Kong edition, the UOB-sponsored satellite show, which presents more than 100 galleries, has started to find its own voice, look and feel. This year, Art Central returns from March 18 to 22. In short, it’s developing a platform to showcase next-generation talent from Asia’s most innovative galleries, with an eclectic and highly collectable group of global galleries and artists.

In that vein, Hong Kong-based curator Kyle Chung will oversee the fair’s acclaimed public art sector, Projects, which features the work of new-media artists selected for their innovation in aesthetics, medium, content and/or context. Chung most recently curated Ellen Pau: Time After Time Will Tell in Singapore and #You #Me #OurSelfies at the Hong Kong Visual Arts Centre. Projects will comprise large-scale installations and immersive experiences, all  looking to break the boundaries of traditional art-fair fare. 

Once again, the fair will collaborate with Asia Society Hong Kong as its education partner. This year heralds the launch of Live at Art Central, which explores topical themes in contemporary art through talks and Q&As with some of the region’s most celebrated visual artists, curators, influencers, KOLs and cultural game-changers. 

Ensuring consistency in brand and theme, Australia’s Sydney-based 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art returns as the fair’s performance partner for 2020, with a far-reaching programme that explores contemporary art practice in the wider Asia region and includes projects by Chun Yin Rainbow Chan (Australia), Amitesh Grover (India) and Once and Again (Hong Kong). 

This year’s edition also sees the fair’s director, Corey Andrew Barr, take over the reins. An art-world veteran and a Hong Kong resident, he has worked as a specialist in contemporary art at the Phillips auction house and as director of a prominent Hong Kong gallery. His local knowledge should keep the fair in balanced hands as its popularity continues to spread. 

Hong Kong Harbourfront, 9 Lung Wo Road, Central (artcentralhongkong.com)

Image provided to China Daily

Back to top

CBDZHKSHOW2019_V19.jpg

Shall We Dance?


1分快三玩法Carol Bove’s work beguiles and beautifies in material juxtapositions and unexpected nuances at David Zwirner in Hong Kong

Shall We Dance?


Carol Bove’s work beguiles and beautifies in material juxtapositions and unexpected nuances at David Zwirner in Hong Kong

Culture > Art


 

Shall We Dance?

November 13, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Image above: Part of Carol Bove’s Hong Kong show at David Zwirner 

If female artists have struggled to wrest the spotlight from their male peers, consider the lot of Carol Bove (pronounced “bo-vay”), who makes heavy, intense sculptures forged out of stainless steel in a Brooklyn-based studio, which she then crushes and paints in vibrant colours, resulting in an elegant, fabric-like finish. Such is the challenge of this modern-day Her-phaestus, whose inaugural Asia show Ten Hours1分快三玩法 (until December 14 at David Zwirner at H Queen’s in Hong Kong) is attracting conspicuous buzz. 

Bove’s trajectory has been steep since emerging in the early 2000s, exhibiting at many of the world’s major institutions and prominently featuring in both the 2019 and 2017 Venice Biennales. She’s collected by culture vultures such as Adrian Cheng; the New World Development executive vice-chairman has one of Bove’s works displayed at his K11 Musea art/retail mall in Tsim Sha Tsui. 

The surface tension and ugly/beauty trickery Bove invokes and subverts is much of her appeal. To witness her hulking works in the flesh – or, rather, metal – is a revelation. The nuanced, poetic and feminine qualities of her sculpture stand in stark contrast to the labour-intensive circumstances of their production. 

1分快三玩法“One thing about these works is that they contain a lot of force,” says Bove, who chooses her words with care, as if executing dance steps. “But the resulting power you see can be very tender. I want the touch to appear very light and soft.” 

One such piece is the powerful, large-scale sculpture Offenbach Barcarolle (2019), the title of which refers to Jacques Offenbach’s final opera, The Tales of Hoffmann1分快三玩法 (1881). It espouses material and visual alchemy; what appears as awkward, bulky contradiction on cursory glance soon softens, succumbs and attains musicality, dance or even romance. 

“I think about a viewer’s progression through the space,” says Bove. “You enact a certain dance as the views unfold in a particular sequence. I try to anticipate these sequences and play with them so that there are reveals and surprises, encouraging the viewer to stand in different parts of the room and feel the space in different ways.” Such is the way of Bove, where finding the space, and the art, is a way of opening up the world.

The First Braid (2019)

La Luce (2019)

Anamorphic Skull (2019)

Images: Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner (The First Braid, La Luce, Anamorphic Skull); provided to China Daily

Back to top

heading.jpg

Digital Dependency


The new London exhibition 24/7 is a wake-up call for our non-stop world

Digital Dependency


1分快三玩法The new London exhibition 24/7 is a wake-up call for our non-stop world

Culture > Art


 

Digital Dependency

November 13, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Joseph Wright of Derby,  Arkwright’s Cotton Mills by Night  (1782)

Joseph Wright of Derby, Arkwright’s Cotton Mills by Night (1782)

There are more smartphones in the world than there are people and the device’s proliferation is outpacing the growth of the human population, according to the United Nations’ International Telecommunications Union. The inability to switch off has become one of the most important and pressing issues of our time. It has been estimated that, in Britain, people check their smartphones every 12 minutes, when taken as an average over a 24-hour period. 

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings named the company’s biggest competitor: not Amazon or YouTube, but sleep. He explained, “We’re competing with sleep, on the margin. And so, it’s a very large pool of time.” There’s so much competition, it can seem as if there are not enough hours in a day to actually stop and sleep. And when we’re sleep-deprived, our ability to pay attention reduces drastically and our productivity drops, creating new economies around self-tracking devices and other sleep aids. 

1分快三玩法So great is the problem that it’s considered a public health epidemic. As of last month, 5.13 billion people in the world owned mobile devices – 66.5% of the world’s population. And it’s growing. Generation Z (people born between the mid-1990s and the early 2000s) is the demographic that owns the most smartphones; some 98% own a smartphone and 52% claim it is their most valuable asset. 

It’s estimated that an average person spends two hours and 52 minutes per day on their mobile device. About 22% of users check their phone every five minutes. So it’s not just an epidemic – it’s also an addiction. 

Read More

Mat Collishaw,  The Machine Zone 00-01  (2019)

Mat Collishaw, The Machine Zone 00-01 (2019)

In London until February 23, 2020, Somerset House’s latest exhibition 24/7, inspired by the book 24/7: Late Capitalism and the Ends of Sleep by essayist Jonathan Carey, takes visitors on a journey through five zones based on the tensions of life in a non-stop world. New technologies have blurred the boundaries between day and night, activity and rest, the human and the machine, work and leisure, and the individual and the collective. 

Interestingly, the beginnings of this 24/7 culture can be traced back to the Industrial Revolution, with workers being rostered around the clock. The distinction between day and night effectively eroded, disrupting the body’s natural rhythms – and that has intensified during the Information Age. 

Early examples of the phenomena include Joseph Wright of Derby’s Arkwright’s Cotton Mills by Night1分快三玩法 (1782), in which he painted a Derbyshire cotton mill owned by Richard Arkwright, inventor of the modern factory. It is believed to be one of the earliest depictions of British 24/7 culture, with workers made to do shifts around the clock. 

1分快三玩法It’s a reminder of how the split between business and leisure time has blurred, with more homeworkers and more coffee shops becoming working hubs than ever before. Once touted as the future of employment, the current gig economy has proven a honey trap for some; despite the illusion of greater flexibility and freedom away from the office, the reality can be quite precarious, requiring more time for work and less for rest and relaxation. It often leaves individuals in isolation, rather than part of a collective who can convene to champion workers’ rights. 

Tatsuo Miyajima,  Life Palace (Tea Room)  (2013)

Tatsuo Miyajima, Life Palace (Tea Room) (2013)

Roman Signer’s Bett (1996) shows a film of the Swiss artist asleep on his bed as a remote-controlled helicopter frenetically swoops and hovers above his head. Tatsuo Miyajima’s Life Palace (Tea Room)1分快三玩法 (2013) is a meditative isolation chamber, through which the Japanese artist invites people to climb and, within the blue glow of blinking LED numbers, drink in the passage of time. 

Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard’s Somnoproxy (2019) is a futuristic story in which someone offers services to sleep on behalf of wealthy executives who are too busy and stressed to get any sleep for themselves. Visitors are invited to lie down in a large hotel bedroom and experience this sonic escape from reality. 

British artist Mat Collishaw’s The Machine Zone 00-01 (2019) sees six animatronic birds move inside glass boxes, exploring the idea of random reward. The concept highlights the algorithms driving social media interactions and has been linked to our likelihood to become addicted to them. 

And Australian artist Tega Brain reveals the hacks to cheat fitness-tracking devices such as Fitbit in her project Unfit Bits (2015). The simple DIY strategies trick wearable technologies into believing that people have engaged in more physical activity than they have, helping to produce data to qualify them for incentives from employers or insurers, even if they can’t afford a high-exercise lifestyle. Unfit Bits’ hacks highlight the unreliability of such data streams – ones on which we seem to increasingly depend. 

Punctuating the entire exhibit are author Douglas Coupland’s provocative Slogans for the 21st Century (2011–present), boldly printed on brightly coloured backgrounds that echo the form and colour of standardised paper found globally in office environments and Instagram posts. There are 148 all-caps proclamations – such as “Being Middle Class Was Fun”, “Automated Governments Are Inevitable” and “I Miss My Pre-Internet Brain” – that surround viewers and speak emphatically to contemporary citizens, indicating how much society has changed within one generation and hinting at more dramatic changes to come.

Douglas Coupland,  Slogans for the 21st Century  (2011-present)

Douglas Coupland, Slogans for the 21st Century (2011-present)

Douglas Coupland,  Slogans for the 21st Century  (2011-present)

Douglas Coupland, Slogans for the 21st Century (2011-present)

Douglas Coupland,  Slogans for the 21st Century  (2011-present)

Douglas Coupland, Slogans for the 21st Century (2011-present)

Images: © Stephen Chung for Somerset House (The Machine Zone, Slogans for the 21st Century(photoshot with female)); courtesy Lisson Gallery (Life Palace); © Douglas Coupland (Slogans for the 21st Century)

Back to top

head.jpg

Oink, Oink


1分快三玩法Bid for a porcine pal in the Sovereign Art Foundation’s public art and charity project Year of the Pig

Oink, Oink


Bid for a porcine pal in the Sovereign Art Foundation’s public art and charity project Year of the Pig

Culture > Art


 

Oink, Oink 

October 30, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

The Sovereign Art Foundation’s (SAF) “Year of the Pig” public art project and charity auction has been a revelation. In support of the children SAF helps through the Make it Better programme, for the current year in the Chinese zodiac, the organisation asked prominent artists to paint a pig. International artists received a sculpture of a mother pig to paint, while local artists were given piglets. 

Among the porcine highlights are iconic Hong Kong artist Frog King’s graffiti-ed work, British artist Gavin Turk’s titanium-covered iteration and local fashion illustrator Pirate’s pig, which comes with vocal accompaniment by way of snorting and oinking. Meanwhile, French artist (and former ballerina) Ophelia Jacarini’s dramatic creation is the only creature that dangles suspended on a chain from the ceiling, rather than standing on the floor. 

1分快三玩法The pigs have graced various locations around the city, including Tai Kwun and other Henderson Land properties, the Cathay Pacific Business Lounge at Hong Kong International Airport and several popular restaurants. All the pigs are for sale, with proceeds helping disadvantaged children around Hong Kong. ()

“In the current climate, there has never been a greater need to try and bridge the widening wealth gap in our city,” says Howard Bilton, founder and chairman of the SAF. “Our Make it Better programmes help to do just that – using the expressive arts to assist children from low-income families, and give them a chance when otherwise they would have little or none.”  

The SAF currently supports arts programmes for vulnerable children in Nepal, Mongolia and Vietnam, as well as in Hong Kong. Its Make it Better project works with children with special educational needs, and runs weekly workshops in 33 locations around the city, partnering with experienced local organisations and schools that help identify children most in need of support.

1.jpg
SKM_368e19102113130.jpg
SKM_368e19102115080.jpg

Images provided to China Daily

1分快三玩法 Back to top

head.jpg

Reality Bytes


1分快三玩法The visual culture of urban cyberpunk has saturated our collective imagination – and it’s in full bloom at a new Tai Kwun exhibition

Reality Bytes


The visual culture of urban cyberpunk has saturated our collective imagination – and it’s in full bloom at a new Tai Kwun exhibition

Culture > Art


 

Reality Bytes

October 16, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Image above: Chen Wei, In the Waves (2013), photograph on lightbox

Zheng Mahler,  Nostalgia Machines  (2019), 15-foot video installation in collaboration with Reijiro Aoyama, musical score by John Bartley and Gordon Mathews

Zheng Mahler, Nostalgia Machines1分快三玩法 (2019), 15-foot video installation in collaboration with Reijiro Aoyama, musical score by John Bartley and Gordon Mathews

Despite its futuristic fame, the Fritz Lang-directed sci-fi film Metropolis (1927) was only a small part of it. The rise of industry and money and man’s role – with the masses working as slaves for the ruling elite in a mega-city – formed the mainstay. With its art-deco urban landscape, futuristic skyline and obsession with technology’s potential to create machines that might soon replace human beings, the visionary film pre-empted the zeitgeist and now feels, a century later, like a trophy moment for today’s digital analytics.

In one of the film’s crowning sequences, Maria (played by Brigitte Helm) undergoes a Frankensteinian DNA-sequencing transmission as if by virtual hula hoop, wakes as an electronic diva – a female C-3PO who appeared 50 years before Star Wars1分快三玩法 – and dances a veiled, minxy, sinuous routine that’s so Mata-Hari-esque, the corpses of the Seven Deadly Sins rise in unison to play musical instruments in thrall to her seductive sheen and glossy exotica. Lang does for cinema what Mary Shelley did for literature. 

Lang, it transpires, was influenced by seeing New York in its nascent period of modernisation: “The film was born from my first sight of the skyscrapers in New York in October 1924… the buildings seemed to be a vertical sail, scintillating and very light, a luxurious backdrop, suspended in the dark sky to dazzle, distract and hypnotise.”

Read More

Metropolis1分快三玩法 was the preface to what would become cyberpunk. The genre, from the outset, has depicted radical technological advances – plugged-in consciousness, androids that are indistinguishable from people – and worlds divided by unequal access to wealth and resources, where the multinational corporations, the sovereign states, the hackers, and the criminal underworld all vie for control. 

Seiko Mikami,  The World Memorable: Suitcase  (1993)

Seiko Mikami, The World Memorable: Suitcase (1993)

2019 is the year when numerous iconic cyberpunk films including Blade Runner (1982) and Akira (1988) are set. After decades of cyberpunk influence across a broad range of visual and written culture, the new Hong Kong exhibition Phantom Plane: Cyberpunk in the Year of the Future (until January 4, 2020 at JC Contemporary in Tai Kwun), considers the hold that the genre retains on our collective imagination by assessing how its tropes have bled into art and visual culture. It also explores and revisits how the genre’s aesthetics and futurisms can be seen from Hong Kong, one model of the “meta-city” – a sprawling urban space that’s just as virtual as it is real. 

Cyberpunk has indirectly affected (and often reflected) Hong Kong’s visual culture, but through refractions of novels, movies and, in particular, anime, its influence has been pervasive. The present also offers a particular prism: how the cyber-metropolis has shifted from a fantastic metaphor for life in the future into an inescapable, looping present.

Far from having become outdated, cyberpunk’s dystopian scenes – its protagonists, networked and yet isolated, navigate neo-noir city streets that are illuminated by the glare of commerce – look like an average night on the town in 2019, whether you’re in Hong Kong, Los Angeles, Tokyo or Jakarta. Like so much that was once seen as pre-millennium “cyber” or “virtual” – as outside of us, a separate and distinct terrain to be explored or conquered in a neo-colonial fashion – the realms of cyberpunk have begun to seem less like an otherworldly plane and more like a funhouse mirror of our world, lives and histories. 

As part of the exhibition, Hong Kong-based art collective Zheng Mahler’s 2019 installation Nostalgia Machines highlights how Asian urban spaces continue to be evoked through techno-orientalist fantasies of the West, but also in the dystopian imagining of the future in Japanese popular culture such as anime. 

Meanwhile, Japanese photographer Takehiko Nakafuji’s Nightcrawler, Hong Kong, Tokyo, a visual representation of a city’s deformation and regeneration that was shot post-2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster and pre-2020 Tokyo Olympics, reflects on Japan’s capital city. “Tokyo continues as a demon city of swirling energy, an ever-transforming monster, spinning out of control,” he posits. “Everything is nihilistic chaos.” 

Korean artist Lee Bul’s After Bruno Taut1分快三玩法, at once ancient and futuristic, shows us that utopia and dystopia are often one and the same. Note how she equates the material transparency (shimmering glass skyscrapers) with invisible corporate power and a pervasive surveillance society where no one can hide. 

The more cyberpunk’s futures turn into reflections of our unremarkable, quotidian daily experiences, the more today’s science fiction is left in an awkward relationship with the future. Instead of forward-facing narratives, contemporary sci-fi has become dominated by crisis modes and generic fantasies of perpetual disaster. But whichever chronology and geography of cyberpunk you explore, it’s hard not to ignore the allure of its seductive ubiquity. From metropolis to monster; from Maria to cyborg; and from neuromancer to near-dystopia… here’s to the future.

Images: Courtesy of the artist(s) (In the Waves, Nostalgia Machines); from a private collection, Germany (Verkehrswesen); courtesy of Galerie Hubert Winter, Vienna (The World Memorable: Suitcase); from a private collection, Hong Kong (Interview); courtesy of Take Ninagawa, Tokyo © Shinro Ohtake (Mon Cheri: A Self-Portrait as a Scrapped Shed); courtesy of Tai Kwun

1分快三玩法 Back to top

head.jpg

Poster Nation


China’s propaganda art was more than politics – suffused with education and modern avant-garde visuals, it portrayed a lifestyle to a better world

Poster Nation


1分快三玩法China’s propaganda art was more than politics – suffused with education and modern avant-garde visuals, it portrayed a lifestyle to a better world

Culture > Art


 

Poster Nation

October 3, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

坐飛船游太空/Roaming outer space in an airship, 1962

坐飛船游太空/Roaming outer space in an airship, 1962

As mass media in the early 20th century became the visual language of political poster art, colourful and artful propaganda posters accompanied almost every event or development that took place for more than three decades in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) from 1949. The posters, which espoused a kind of “total art”, functioned like a new iconography that accompanied the nation’s transition into a modern socio-political structure, serving a national purpose and an aspirational need. They also gave expression to many different types of policies and many different visions of the future that the Chinese Communist Party looked to over the years. 

1分快三玩法The arts have played a vital role throughout history in the Chinese system and been used to spread messages on “correct” behaviour and thought. Mao Zedong believed the social content of art should dictate form. His 1942 talk at the Yan’an Forum on Literature and Art urged revolutionary artists to utilise folk art forms of the peasant class to bring about change in the countryside. For Mao, art wasn’t intended to be an ecosystem of intellectuals, elites and so-called literati, but something for the masses. Clarity, directness and simplicity became the mantra for his social realism. 

1分快三玩法The purposes of the posters were manifold; they were intended to mobilise, inform, congratulate, inspire, instruct and appease the people. They had reach, too. Large numbers of illiterate people could understand them, which meant the Party had a visual means of educating the people – and a very dynamic one at that, paraded as the posters were in offices, factories, dormitories and houses.

Read More

我國第一個五年計劃的鐵路建設/Railroad construction under the First Five Year Plan of our nation, 1956

我國第一個五年計劃的鐵路建設/Railroad construction under the First Five Year Plan of our nation, 1956

The overriding message was to portray the future in the present, not only showing life as it really was but also life as it ought to be – an artful commingling of fact and fiction. It presented a future in which women were prominent, having equal rights with men, being able to vote (1953), and just as likely to fly to the moon or join the army and fire rockets alongside their male counterparts. Thus, beyond the slogans printed on the posters, the visual content evoked an aspirational lifestyle or universalism – the promise of a bountiful future not just for China, but also for the world.

The posters were popular for their composition and visual content, to the extent that many people didn’t pay much attention to the Maoisms printed underneath. In such a way, the political message of the posters was passed on in a subconscious manner. Much of that was due to the visible seduction of the works, conjured as they were by talented artists commissioned to depict political trends of the moment. Many had been commercial calendar designers in the 1930s before the founding of the PRC and were familiar with the ways of advertising; their careers had risen alongside Shanghai’s development as a trading hub. 

1分快三玩法The Great Leap Forward (1958–1962) and the subsequent Cultural Revolution (1966–1976), saw poster production reach a climax, in which the medium reached its peak in terms of artistic expression in form and content. There was unchecked production of woodcut print posters, all recording the minutiae of political life, no matter how insignificant, with their immediacy and newsworthiness becoming part of their charm. Viewed from the perspective of contemporary art, the Cultural Revolution could be interpreted as a heritage street-art exhibition on an unparalleled scale. 

A point not lost on publishers and the art world. “Ironically, these posters that once defined the image of China, and are now so highly covetable among collectors, have become folk-heritage items,” writes Stefan Landsberger, author of the recently published Chinese Propaganda Posters by Taschen. 

Which is something that could be said of the spirit and strength of Chinese art, as vibrant, dynamic and avant-garde today as it was from 1942 onwards. The radicality of modern Chinese cultural reform, its paradigm shift on a civilisational scale, is as strong as ever – and the lust for change ripples on into the future. From the promise of a space program in 1962 to match Russia and the US, which materialised and became Shenzhou V in 2003, to the urgent need to address climate change and the environment in the late 80s and early 90s, also acknowledged and acted on - China is now a pioneer on both fronts. Contemporary China continues to push a global agenda in its new avant-gardian splendour.

銀球傳友誼/Table tennis spreads friendship, 1972

1分快三玩法銀球傳友誼/Table tennis spreads friendship, 1972


Chinese Propaganda Posters, with essays by Stefan R. Landsberger, Anchee Min, Duo Duo, published by Taschen ( taschen.com)
1分快三玩法Images/ part of the IISH / Stefan R. Landsberger / Private Collection ()

The vibrant setting for Get Up, Stand Up Now.jpg

Black Ecstatic


1分快三玩法A major exhibition in London celebrates the past 50 years of black creativity in Britain and beyond

Black Ecstatic


1分快三玩法A major exhibition in London celebrates the past 50 years of black creativity in Britain and beyond

Culture > Art


 

Black Ecstatic

July 24, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Image above: The vibrant setting for Get Up, Stand Up Now

Richard Rawlins,  The True Crown  (2018) from the series  I Am Sugar

Richard Rawlins, The True Crown (2018) from the series I Am Sugar

There are so many works that, politically and culturally, hit you right between the eyes at Get Up, Stand Up Now, an exhibition celebrating how black art pioneers have shaped the UK over the last 50 years. They connect in so many different ways and means that it’s hard to prioritise any of them. For sheer immediacy and unforgettable impact, however, Richard Rawlins’ black-power fist rising from a gilt-edged Victorian cup of tea in The True Crown (2018) dishes out some beating. It’s a powerful statement that explicitly invokes conflict between the airs, graces, niceties and sweetness of traditional English afternoon tea versus the plight of the black slaves working on the sugar plantations. It’s stark, brutal, incontrovertible black-and-white truth. A 1970s fashion shoot by Armet Francis in Brixton Market, in which a model sits glamorously bedecked in a flowing lilac suit and headpiece with her heeled red-shoed foot atop a white line in the road, is forceful but softer – like an exclamation mark to the beauty of the black aesthetic. 

These contrasts abound at London’s Somerset House West Wing galleries. Beginning with the Windrush generation and extending to today’s brilliant young black talent from around the world, a group of 110 interdisciplinary artists are showcasing their work together for the first time. They explore black experience and influence, from the post-war era to the present day, and how its makers have merged the personal and political to highlight the issues of their time. 

1分快三玩法In this multisensory gathering (on until September 15), historic works and new commissions sit alongside items from personal archives. Curator and visual artist Zak Ové has invited each artist to exhibit as a true groundbreaker of their generation and their genre.

The talent includes photographer Rhea Storr, who explores mixed-race identity growing up in Yorkshire; Scottish band Young Fathers; designer Martine Rose, one of the UK’s most underrated fashion forces (and a judge at the Hong Kong Young Fashion Designers’ Contest last September as part of Centrestage); Grace Wales Bonner, the 28-year-old Central Saint Martins graduate whose fashion collections have been inspired by the likes of Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie, jazz esoteric Alice Coltrane and early 20th-century Harlem, and who recently staged her first exhibition at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery, titled A Time for New Dreams in homage to an essay collection by Nigerian poet Ben Okri; and short film and music video director Jenn Nkiru, who worked on Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s “Apeshit” video as a second-unit director, and who premiered her short film Black to Techno (on Detroit techno music) at Frieze Los Angeles in February.

Read More

Armet Francis,  Fashion Shoot Brixton Market  (1973)

Armet Francis, Fashion Shoot Brixton Market (1973)

There’s also Turner Prize-winning artists Steve McQueen and Lubaina Himid; the Scottish-born, Trinidad-based painter Peter Doig; and artist Yinka Shonibare, whose Revolution Kid (Calf) – a fibreglass human mannequin dressed in vibrantly coloured African fabrics but with the head of a cow, and holding golden guns and smartphones – draws attention to the postcolonial relationship between Africa and Europe and the economic disparity between the two, while also appealing to youth via the tools of emancipation, violence and globalisation. It still looks as striking and poignant today as when it first showed at Art Basel in 2012. 

The exhibition has been designed by London-based, Nigerian-born Yinka Ilori, who references the vibrant, dynamic colours and patterns of his African roots. The gallery rooms are separated into five themes: Motherland, Masquerade, Dream to Change the World, Imaginary Landscapes and Mothership. There’s also a “temple to learning” conceived by Nigerian-American artist Victor Ekpuk, which contains the ambitious Afrofuturist mural Shrine to Wisdom. A selection of titles on black history and culture are also available for visitors to indulge. 

But it all begins with the curator’s father, Horace Ové, who is widely known for creating the first feature film by a black British director, Pressure (which was ultimately released in 1976 after being shelved for a few years) – about a black British teenager and the racism he experiences. Zak Ové hopes the show will set the stage for a reassessment of his father’s legacy. “I’m really excited that the public will be able to see my father’s work again, or perhaps discover it,” he says. “He was such a pioneer of his time.”

As is Zak. In the Mothership room, seek out his sculpture Umbilical Progenitor, of a barefoot black astronaut carrying a child on its back that refers to African traditions of masquerades. The work, as does the room, invites now-and-next generations of creative black artists to use Afrofuturism as the voice and space of black power, a force that seems now undeniable. Nkiru’s Black to Techno film closes with the line: “The black ecstatic cannot be contained.” And then some.

Images: Copyright of the artist (Holding Onto Daddy, The True Crown); © Peter Macdiarmid (Self Portrait (After Warhol) 6, the vibrant setting for Get Up, Stand Up Now, Shrine to Wisdom); courtesy of the artist ( Fashion Shoot Brixton Market); courtesy of the artist and Galerie Éric Hussenot, Paris. Photo: Brendan Dalzin (Figure at Treetop)

Back to top

head.jpg

Know Your Manga


On the eve of the British Museum’s largest exhibition of manga held outside of Japan, which runs through the summer until August 26, Nicole Rousmaniere, the museum’s IFAC Handa Curator of Japanese Arts, tells us all about this global phenomenon

Know Your Manga


On the eve of the British Museum’s largest exhibition of manga held outside of Japan, which runs through the summer until August 26, Nicole Rousmaniere, the museum’s IFAC Handa Curator of Japanese Arts, tells us all about this global phenomenon

Culture > Art


 

Know Your Manga

June 26, 2019 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

The Poe Clan , Hagio Moto, (on the cover of  Flower  magazine)

The Poe Clan, Hagio Moto, (on the cover of Flower magazine)

So what is manga, exactly? 

1分快三玩法Manga is a Japanese comic book or graphic novel with a twist, serialised in newspapers and magazines. Originating in Japan, it now has fans across the globe and is immersive storytelling through pictures, where the images rule supreme. The Japanese characters for “manga” translate as “pictures run riot” or “pictures unbounded”, and there is less reliance on text; the narrative is created through expressive line-drawing, along with the visual development of individual characters. It is this visually immersive quality that makes it so popular.

How did it develop? 

Manga’s roots are international and can be traced back as far as 1200 CE, but the form as we know it today first emerged from serialised cartoon strips in various magazines and newspapers in the 1920s. Its popularity developed throughout the 20th century and it now boasts a global reach. The phenomenon is still expanding and includes animation (known as “anime” in Japan), art, fashion, graffiti, digital multimedia and gaming.

How big is manga? 

It’s a multi-billion-pound industry, fuelled by its readers and viewers. It’s immensely popular with people of every age in Japan and increasingly across the world. With hundreds of genres, from sports to love, and from horror to sexual identity, there is a manga for everyone. 

A particularly popular example is One Piece, by Oda Eiichiro, which tells the adventures of a boy whose body has become rubberised after eating “gum-gum fruit” and who travels the world on a pirate ship in search of a priceless treasure: the legendary One Piece. Created for the publisher Shueisha in 1997, it’s still going strong and has filled 91 individual volumes. One Piece has more than 440 million books in circulation worldwide, making it the best-selling manga of all time and earning it a place in the Guinness Book of World Records.

Read More

Saint Young Men (Seinto Oniisan),  Nakamura Hikaru

Saint Young Men (Seinto Oniisan), 1分快三玩法Nakamura Hikaru

Tell us more about the business and production sides… 

Many large publishers in Japan derive a significant portion of their profits from manga. It’s very big business – the turnover of the domestic manga industry in 2016 was approximately £3 billion. Four of the top publishers who control a large share of the market are Kodansha, Hakusensha, Shogakukan and Shueisha. They’re constantly competing and trying to retain popular artists. Editors are assigned by the publishing houses to specific artists and play a key role in developing stories in collaboration with them. They often help with content, managing the production schedules, overall formatting and conducting basic research for the artist on the theme or images depicted. 

What’s the best way to read manga? 

Manga is produced in many different formats, now including those made for mobile devices, which lets you adapt how you wish to read it. Traditionally, the books are read from back to front and from the upper-right corner to the lower-left corner of a page. Formats include the simple four-panel manga (yonkoma), mostly seen in newspapers or on mobile phones; magazine compendiums of serialised artists (the weekly shūkanshi and monthly gekkanshi); and individual books of specific manga or authors (tankōbon). There are also fanzines and independently published fan-created comics (dōjinshi).

The brilliant artist Kōno Fumiyo recently published the book Giga Town: Album of Manga Symbols in order to help us understand the grammar and symbols embedded within the medium. Drawing animals based on the 12th-century handscroll Chōjū-giga, Kōno makes the manga symbols, called manpu, come alive. Here we see her heroine, a young white rabbit named Mimi-chan, racing a turtle that could be straight out of Aesop’s Fables. They also help explain the meaning of the use of spirals in manga – namely to show something spinning, either in movement or in one’s head through dizziness.

About anime, what’s the relationship? 

Originally printed in newspapers, then in magazines and single-volume books, manga is now going digital and is available in many different formats – and almost all languages. If popular, a manga may become the basis for an anime series or film. 

Princess Jellyfish (Kuragehime) , Higashimura Akiko

Princess Jellyfish (Kuragehime), Higashimura Akiko

Golden Kamuy1分快三玩法 is a relatively new manga that has published more than nine million copies and is now a popular anime translated into English. Written by Noda Satoru, it’s a dramatic action tale that takes place in the early 1900s on the northern island of Hokkaido. The hero, Sugimoto, teams up with a local Ainu girl named Asirpa to attempt to find gold stolen from the indigenous Ainu community in a deadly race with the Imperial Japanese 7th Division Army and other assorted (and often unsavoury) characters.

1分快三玩法Noda, a Hokkaido native, told me how he researched all aspects of the manga, including eating the food portrayed. Both the manga and the anime are gripping, as well as beautiful and educational – you learn about Hokkaido and Ainu customs as you become absorbed in the story.

And in Japan, some manga is designed along gender lines? 

Different strands have evolved for male and female audiences. Shōnen, aimed at young men, tends to focus on action and adventure, while shōjo is aimed at young women and focuses on romance and relationships. However, there is increasing crossover in the plotlines, the subject matter and the gender of protagonists. Shōjo can also include stories of male homosexual relationships, known as “boys’ love” or BL (yaoi).

Higashimura Akiko is a brilliant young shōjo artist. Heavily influenced by shōjo from the 1980s, she is known for titles aimed at young women. They include the award-winning Princess Jellyfish1分快三玩法, which was published as a series by Kodansha as a result of demand from fans and has been turned into an anime that is currently being translated into English. 

Hagio Moto is a pioneer in shōjo, and a master of emotional depth and sophistication in her storylines. Among her classics is The Poe Clan series, which continues to thrill after 40 years. The story revolves around a secret family of vampanellas (vampires) in 18th- to 20th-century Europe, with beautiful images that draw you into a hidden and dangerous reality. At the beginning of 2018, she was honoured with a rare production of this work at Takarazuka Grand Theatre, much to the delight of her large fan base. And from May 2018, the shōjo magazine Flowers, whose cover you see above, started publishing her new storyline on the theme, picking up 40 years after the series ended – watch this space!

Images: ©Shogakukan Inc (Flower magazine); © Akiko Higashimura/Kodansha Ltd. (Princess Jellyfish); ©Satoru Noda/Shueisha (Golden Kamuy); ©Yoichi Takahashi/Shueisha (Captain Tsubasa); ©Tezuka Productions (Metropolis); © Fumiyo Kouno/Asahi Shimbun Publications Inc (Giga Town); © Hikaru Nakamura/Kodansha Ltd (Saint Young Men)

1分快三玩法 Back to top

20736365544d17b7-1.php.jpg

Hot Shot


The gun that may or may not have killed Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh goes to auction

Hot Shot


The gun that may or may not have killed Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh goes to auction

Culture > Art


 

Hot Shot

June 12, 2019 / by Zhang Yen

47 Self-Portrait Musee d'Orsay.jpg

In 1965, the same year that Andy Warhol was producing endless iterations of his photographic silkscreen series such as his Campbell’s soup cans, a French farmer walked across a field in the village of Auvers-sur-Oise, north of Paris, and discovered a rusted Belgian-manufactured Lefaucheux revolver. Of note was that it had purportedly been last used by 37-year-old post-impressionist and highly tormented Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh, who shot himself in the stomach on July 29, 1890. 

1分快三玩法Described as “the most famous weapon in art history”, the gun is expected to sell well beyond its US$45,000–US$56,000 estimate when it goes to auction on June 19, courtesy of AuctionArt Rémy Le Fur & Associés at Drouot in Paris. The 7mm revolver, reportedly kept by the family that owned the Auberge Ravoux inn where the artist stayed in the final months of his life, is now being sold by the descendants of the original owners. 

1分快三玩法The appetite for Van Gogh has never been greater than now. This year alone, the artist is the subject of an exhibition at Tate Britain until August; FTLife Tower in Hong Kong’s Kowloon Bay is also showing a multisensory exhibition of the artist’s work and there are another nine shows happening around the world. 

1分快三玩法The smoking gun in the artist’s narrative is that while the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam insists he took his own life, speculation has mounted in recent years that his shooting was by accident rather than by design – and that the gun went off during a struggle between the artist and some other locals. (It certainly wouldn’t be out of character; Van Gogh’s friendship with Paul Gauguin ended after a confrontation with a razor, when in a rage he famously severed part of his own left ear). After being shot or having shot himself in the stomach, it was another 30 apparently painful hours before Dr Paul Gachet pronounced the artist dead.

However, while the show’s catalogue is far from definitive on the subject of the Lefaucheux, claiming only that there exists “a strong possibility that he [Van Gogh] used this weapon in his suicide attempt”, the auction house goes on to list pieces of evidence that substantiate its provenance as the suicide weapon. It was found where Van Gogh had shot it; the bullet found in the artist’s body was the same calibre as the gun; and studies showed the weapon had lain untouched in the ground since the 1890s. Authentic or otherwise, the gun-meets-gavel face-off will be keenly anticipated.

Images provided to China Daily

Back to top

Page

12 34567

var _hmt = _hmt || []; (function() { var hm = document.createElement("script"); hm.src = "https://hm.baidu.com/hm.js?c389047ca1869742b66133401b49bb0c"; var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(hm, s); })();